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    Harriet Tubman (1820?-1913) - Underground Railroad conductor, Army scout, African-American suffragette.

    This is thought to be the only known photo of an African-American Union soldier with his family.

    Ruby Bridges - an American hero

    Araminta Harriet Ross - Harriet Tubman. (1820 – March 10, 1913) was an African-American abolitionist, humanitarian, and Union spy during the American Civil War. Born into slavery, Tubman escaped and subsequently made more than thirteen missions to rescue more than 70 slaves using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad.

    "If you hear the dogs, keep going. If you see the torches in the woods, keep going. If there’s shouting after you, keep going. Don’t ever stop. Keep going. If you want a taste of freedom, keep going." -- Harriet Tubman

    General Andrew Jackson was general during the War of 1812.

    Good Guy Jonas... Unheard of now days.

    She died a hero!...... 11/18/2015

    Tubman Slave, Hero, History Pictures, Color, Harriettubman, 300 Slaves

    POW Horace Greasley confronts Nazi leader Heinrich Himmler at a POW camp in Germany during WWII

    Annie Oakley- American Sharpe Shooter

    Harriet Tubman's dedication and sacrifice helped almost 300 people reach freedom from slavery. I honor her life and admire her strength.

    Flags of Our Fathers.

    underground railroad

    Elizabeth Cady Stanton - instrumental in helping pass a law allowing women to own their own property (passed in New York in 1848)

    Anna Mae Dickinson was eight when she lost her father on the Titanic. She was 11 when she lost her Aunt Olivia in the torpedoing of the Lusitania. She was 31 when she lost her first cousin Alfred in the Hindenberg explosion. She was 37 when she lost her nephew Thomas in the bombing of Pearl Harbor.And she was 97 when her tiny apartment was shaken and battered by the collapse of the twin towers on Sept 11, 2001 and blessed by God to have survived it all.

    U.S. Marshals escorting the brave Ruby Bridges. One of the first African Americans to attend a white school.

    1st black pilot with Continental Airlines who had to go through the Supreme Court to get the job. Marlon Dewitt Green (June 6, 1929 – July 6, 2009) was an African-American pilot whose landmark United States Supreme Court decision in 1963 helped dismantle racial discrimination in the American passenger airline industry, leading to David Harris hiring as the first African-American pilot for a major airline the following year.

    Within the fabric of American identity is woven a story that has long been invisible—the lives and experiences of people who share African American and Native American ancestry. African and Native peoples came together in the Americas. Over centuries, African Americans and Native Americans created shared histories, communities, families, and ways of life. Prejudice, laws, and twists of history have often divided them from others, yet African-Native American people were united in the struggle against slavery and dispossession, and then for self-determination and freedom. For African-Native Americans, their double heritage is truly indivisible. The exhibition IndiVisible: African-Native American Lives in the Americas is a collaboration between the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, National Museum of African American History and Culture, and the Smithsonian Institution Travelling Exhibition Service (SITES). Foxx family (Mashpee), 2008 (L to R): Anne, Monet, Majai (baby), Aisha, and Maurice Foxx Photograph by Kevin Cartwright Comanche family, early 1900s Here is a family from the Comanche Nation located in southwestern Oklahoma. The elder man in Comanche traditional clothing is Ta-Ten-e-quer. His wife, Ta-Tat-ty, also wears Comanche clothing. Their niece (center) is Wife-per, also known as Frances E. Wright. Her father was a Buffalo Soldier (an African American cavalryman) who deserted and married into the Comanches. Henry (center left) and Lorenzano (center right) are the sons of Frances, who married an African American man. Courtesy Sam DeVenney