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  • Deborah Goschy

    Army sick ward of flu patients.

  • Darby

    Naval Training Station, San Francisco, California. "Do Not Spit On The Floor, To Do So May Spread Disease" sign on the balcony edge of the Drill Hall floor of the Main Barracks, which is in use as an extemporized sleeping area.// influenza epidemic

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Naval Training Station, San Francisco, California. Crowded sleeping area extemporized on the Drill Hall floor of the Main Barracks, with sneeze screens erected as a precaution against the spread of influenza.

The interior of an influenza ward at a U.S. army field hospital during the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic

Influenza Epidemic of 1918: During 1918's final four months an extraordinarily virulent influenza strain blazed across the Globe, killing as many as a hundred million people, six-percent of the World's population. PHOTO: Naval Training Station, San Francisco, California. Crowded sleeping area extemporized on the Drill Hall floor of the Main Barracks with sneeze screens erected as a precaution against the spread of influenza.

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Naval Training Station, San Francisco, California. Scene in "D" Ward of the Station Hospital, showing sneeze screens erected around beds.

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1918 Flu epidemic. When the board ordered San Francisco residents to don face masks out in public, however, the Chronicle blanketed its front page with pictures of prominent citizens with their faces covered. “Great Variety in Styles of Face Adornment in Evidence,” read a headline. That was Oct. 25. (Ironically, the masks were not effective; the virus was so small that it could pass through gauze.) 20 - 40 million people died in the 1918 flue epidemic.