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(10) The Brownie also enabled the average person to capture emotions involved within historic moments of strife and turmoil. Bernice Palmer, a passenger of the Carpathia, took pictures of Titanic survivors aboard the rescue ship on the morning of April 15, 1912 and later donated them along with her Brownie camera to the Smithsonian. Source: AmericanHistory.si.edu, Image: Encyclopedia-Titanica.org

(10) The Brownie also enabled the average person to capture emotions involved within historic moments of strife and turmoil. Bernice Palmer, a passenger of the Carpathia, took pictures of Titanic survivors aboard the rescue ship on the morning of April 15, 1912 and later donated them along with her Brownie camera to the Smithsonian. Source: AmericanHistory.si.edu, Image: Encyclopedia-Titanica.org

(5) Candid photos were the hallmark of the Brownie, as it first introduced the concept of the snapshot -- a quick and spontaneous picture. Capturing special occasions and everyday activities was made possible for everyone as a result of the Brownie’s portability. The snapshots captured by this camera more accurately depicted real life than portrait style photos, shifting the emphasis from posed stances to authentic moments. Source: Kodak.com, Image: encyclopedia-titanica.org

(5) Candid photos were the hallmark of the Brownie, as it first introduced the concept of the snapshot -- a quick and spontaneous picture. Capturing special occasions and everyday activities was made possible for everyone as a result of the Brownie’s portability. The snapshots captured by this camera more accurately depicted real life than portrait style photos, shifting the emphasis from posed stances to authentic moments. Source: Kodak.com, Image: encyclopedia-titanica.org

(3) Kodak democratized photography for the masses through the Brownie's affordability, ease of use, and compact nature. After the first Brownie camera was shipped on February 8, 1900, it became a staple in every home, as Kodak sold over a quarter of a million Brownies in just the first year of production. Never before had photography had such a wide appeal -- transcending wealth, age, and skill level. Source: About.com, Image: BBCNews.com

(3) Kodak democratized photography for the masses through the Brownie's affordability, ease of use, and compact nature. After the first Brownie camera was shipped on February 8, 1900, it became a staple in every home, as Kodak sold over a quarter of a million Brownies in just the first year of production. Never before had photography had such a wide appeal -- transcending wealth, age, and skill level. Source: About.com, Image: BBCNews.com

Photo Seed blog, bringing to light the growth and artisitc vision of the 19/20th century photography

Photo Seed blog, bringing to light the growth and artisitc vision of the 19/20th century photography

(9) Due to low cost and ease of use, Brownies allowed everyone to use photography to gain further perspective and insight into each other’s lives, even from many miles away. Soldiers often carried these cameras with them to document their daily lives in the trenches and share them with their families back home. Source: BBC News, Image: VintageAdBrowser.com

(9) Due to low cost and ease of use, Brownies allowed everyone to use photography to gain further perspective and insight into each other’s lives, even from many miles away. Soldiers often carried these cameras with them to document their daily lives in the trenches and share them with their families back home. Source: BBC News, Image: VintageAdBrowser.com

These brave men are withstanding the force of Hurricane Sandy to guard The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Photo by davidhelbig

These brave men are withstanding the force of Hurricane Sandy to guard The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Photo by davidhelbig

"I could see the lights of the ship starting to go under water, then soundlessly, perhaps a mile away, it just went down. It was gone. Oh yes, the sky was very black and the stars were very bright. They told me the people in the water were singing, but I knew they were screaming."  Madeleine Mellinger in a Toronto Star interview, April 15, 1974, Titanic survivor

"I could see the lights of the ship starting to go under water, then soundlessly, perhaps a mile away, it just went down. It was gone. Oh yes, the sky was very black and the stars were very bright. They told me the people in the water were singing, but I knew they were screaming." Madeleine Mellinger in a Toronto Star interview, April 15, 1974, Titanic survivor

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