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Cesar Chavez, founder of the United Farm Workers, is pictured here in his office, March 17, 1978. This photograph accompanied a newspaper article by Frank del Olmo, a staff writer specializing in Latin American affairs for the Los Angeles Times. Frank del Olmo Collection. Latino Cultural Heritage Digital Archives.

During the 1960s and 1970s, many Mexican-American residents of East Los Angeles began an attempt to incorporate their neighborhood into a separately-governed city. This 1974 issue of La Luz magazine covered this issue in-depth. Journalist Frank del Olmo collected this magazine and other information like it to help in the background research of his newspaper articles. Frank del Olmo Papers. Latino Cultural Heritage Digital Archives.

Letter from Cesar Chavez to Julian Nava, May 11, 1971. Nava and Chavez worked together throughout their careers. In 1967, Chavez, then president of the National Farm Workers Association (later the United Farm Workers), assisted Nava in his candidacy for the Los Angeles Board of Education. In this letter, Chavez thanks Nava for writing a letter to Congressman Barry Morris Goldwater, Jr., the son of Senator Barry Goldwater. Julian Nava Collection. Latino Cultural Heritage Digital Archives.

"El Popo" is the student newspaper produced by M.E.Ch.A. (Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlán) of San Fernando Valley State College (now CSUN). The paper was launched by then-student Frank del Olmo, later a well-known Los Angeles journalist and voice for the Latino community. This is the front page of the first issue. CSUN University Archives.

Elect Dr. Julian Nava handout. In 1966 a coalition was formed with its goal the election of the first Mexican-American to the Los Angeles Board of Education. This handbill from the 1967 election gives Nava's platform as well as the names of those individuals and organizations that supported him. Julian Nava Collection. Latino Cultural Heritage Digital Archives.

This flyer was distributed by the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee's (AWOC) national director, C. Al Green, and the Conferación Revolucionaria de Obreros y Campesinos (CROC) to alert Mexican agricultural workers working legally in the United States that they have the right to Social Security, unemployment insurance, and a minimum wage, and that they should register with the Farm Labor Sector, September 18, 1965. Max Mont Collection. Latino Cultural Heritage Digital Archives.

Tom Hayden, founder of the Students for a Democratic Society, chair for the Campaign for Economic Democracy and the California SolarCal Council (1978-1982), weighs in on the presidential race of 1980. Daily Sundial, student newspaper of the California State University, Northridge, October 24, 1980. University Archives Photo Collection.

The United Farm Workers (UFW) published the monthly magazine Food and Justice to keep its members and other interested parties up to date with issues important to the Farm Workers movement. The July 1988 issue (Volume 5, Number 5) featured a story on supermarket boycotts and an article about Cesar Chavez's latest fast, which began on July 16, 1988. Millie Moser Smith Papers.

Flyer announcing the play "Who Killed Earl Wright?" Sunday evening, January 29, 1939. Performance was held at the First Baptist church in San Fernando. The cast included Julian Beck, who, according to the penned correction, replaced Fuller as the Judge in the play. Beck was an attorney in 1939, and would later become Superior Court Judge of Los Angeles County. Judge Julian Beck Collection. San Fernando Valley History.Digital Library.