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This is an image of the first graduation at San Fernando Valley State College (SFVSC, now CSUN) in June of 1959. Ninety students received their degrees on the SFVSC football field. This image shows the large expanse of empty land held by the college at this time; visible in the background is the Santa Susana mountain range. CSUN University Digital Archives.

Front page of the Daily Sundial, campus newspaper of San Fernando Valley State College (now CSUN), immediately following the Sylmar Earthquake in February 1971. The front page image is that of thousands of books littering the floor of the old Library. Designated South Library after the completion of the Delmar T. Oviatt Library in 1973, it was demolished following the 1994 Northridge Earthquake. CSUN University Digital Archives .

Construction of first building on the San Fernando Valley State College (now CSUN) campus, 1956. CSUN University Archives.

NORTHRIDGE: #TBT California State University, Northridge (CSUN) art student John Banks was the winner of a contest to design the new university sign, located on the corner of Nordhoff Street and Zelzah Avenue. In this image, Banks hangs from the metal support for the "C" in his "CSUN" spaghetti-letters sculpture. Alumni Collections.

"El Popo" is the student newspaper produced by M.E.Ch.A. (Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlán) of San Fernando Valley State College (now CSUN). The paper was launched by then-student Frank del Olmo, later a well-known Los Angeles journalist and voice for the Latino community. This is the front page of the first issue. CSUN University Archives.

The campus newspaper at San Fernando Valley State College (now CSUN), the Daily Sundial, ran this front-page illustration in the shape of a helmeted soldier in October 1969. Within the silhouette of the soldier's head is newsprint; the articles chosen represent those concerning Vietnam War dead from Southern California. CSUN University Digital Archives.

Scene magazine, Vol. 2, No. 4, 1970. Scene was published by the San Fernando Valley State College (now CSUN) Journalism Department as an alternative to the campus newspaper, the Sundial. This issue is entitled 'The Changing Morality.' The painting "American Gothic" by Grant Wood hangs on the wall behind the "new" American family of 1970. CSUN University Digital Archives.

Students at San Fernando Valley State College (now CSUN) demand information after a section of the Administration Building (now known as Bayramian Hall) is burned. Their demands are simple -- convene a committee to receive evidence and hear testimony in order to uncover as much of the truth as is possible. Students were asked to put their contact information at the bottom of the flier to be part of the committee, called the Students Committee on Conflict. CSUN University Digital Archives.

Throughout the early twentieth century, the San Fernando Valley was farmland; wheat, avocados, oranges, and squash grew in abundance. Founded in 1910 along the Southern Pacific Railroad in the northwest San Fernando Valley, it was among the early housing tracts carved from the former Mission Rancho San Fernando lands. The post office and train depot were renamed Northridge in 1938. Today, California State University, Northridge sits on a portion of that land. CSUN University Archives.

Cartoon from the Sundial, campus newspaper at San Fernando Valley State College (now CSUN). "CCAA - Good Luck Matadors In Your First Game!!" September 29, 1961. CSUN University Archives.

Devonshire Downs flier, circa 1960-1965. Flier advertising the availability of Devonshire Downs for use as an exposition facility and fair grounds. It was owned and operated by the San Fernando Valley State College and located on what is now part of the California State University, Northridge campus. The Downs hosted concerts such as Jimi Hendrix in the late 1960's. Chatsworth Historical Society. San Fernando Valley History Digital Library.

Brochure for W. P. Whitsett's free automobile tour to Van Nuys around 1912. Whitsett owned half interest in the town and was one of its greatest promoters. Los Angeles Valley College Historical Museum. San Fernando Valley History Digital Library.

Commemorating the one-year anniversary of the 1994 Northridge earthquake, President Bill Clinton spoke at California State University, Northridge on January 17, 1995. President Clinton praised federal, state, and local agencies on their recovery efforts. He is shown at a podium bearing the Presidential Seal; behind him is a large black-and-white photograph of a parking structure that partially collapsed as a result of the quake. CSUN University Digital Archives.

Aerial View of California State University, Northridge Campus, ca. 1973 :: CSUN University Archives

The caption of this photograph from the student newspaper at San Fernando Valley State College (now CSUN), the Daily Sundial, reads: "STEREO AND STUDIES - Drama majors Linda DeWoskin and Bonnie Shulem relax in typical Monterey Hall room. The stereo rates supreme, but they say studies do play a part in dorm life." Daily Sundial, Sep. 27, 1963.

Trains slow to 35 mph in the Valley - A Southern Pacific Railroad train moves cautiously through the Valley at a new 35 mile per hour speed limit. Mayor Samuel W. Yorty signed the law June 12, 1962. Southern Pacific had cut its top speeds in the Valley to 60 mph, though the legal maximum in the state (at that time) was 79 mph. The tracks are at the intersection of San Fernando Road and Sunland Boulevard in Sun Valley. Photo Credit: Los Angeles Public Library, Valley Times Collection

This photo of the Los Angeles River between Lindley Avenue and Reseda Blvd., just North of Victory Blvd., in the San Fernando Valley, was taken by Homer Halverson as part of his work with the United States Army Corps of Engineers, January 1955. Homer Halverson Collection. Water Works - Documenting Water History in Los Angeles.

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Community Post: Historic Photographs Of "White" Slaves

Historic photos of "white" slaves from Occupied Louisiana, 1863 and 1864: These children were minority African Mulattoes and most states considered them legally Black for having 1/8th or more African ancestry. As a side note, Sally Hemings was 1/4th African so she and her and Thomas Jefferson's children would have had similar appearance. Racial intermingling, both consensual and non, was much more common in the pre-war South than many tend to believe and was not limited to slaves or the…

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California State University, Northridge (CSUN)

Never see CSUN this way, so romantic~