Photograph of a pack of mules hauling bags of cement for construction of the Los Angeles Aqueduct. Caption on reverse reads "hauling cement to mixer north end Deadman syphen [sic]."  Catherine Mulholland Collection. Water Works - Documenting Water History in Los Angeles.

Photograph of a pack of mules hauling bags of cement for construction of the Los Angeles Aqueduct. Caption on reverse reads "hauling cement to mixer north end Deadman syphen [sic]." Catherine Mulholland Collection. Water Works - Documenting Water History in Los Angeles.

St. Francis Dam Flood March 12-13, 1928, Los Angeles County, California. Looking downstream to huge blocks of cement at the base of the east abutment of the dam. Note dust clouds in the background from landslides that were still in progress. March 17, 1928.

St. Francis Dam Flood March 12-13, 1928, Los Angeles County, California. Looking downstream to huge blocks of cement at the base of the east abutment of the dam. Note dust clouds in the background from landslides that were still in progress. March 17, 1928.

Building the Los Angeles Aqueduct - Framework - Photos and Video - Visual Storytelling from the Los Angeles Times

Building the Los Angeles Aqueduct

Building the Los Angeles Aqueduct - Framework - Photos and Video - Visual Storytelling from the Los Angeles Times

A California art print on Arches watercolor paper. 100% archival, and printed in HD.

Downtown Los Angeles, c. 1940s

A California art print on Arches watercolor paper. 100% archival, and printed in HD.

Two children walk up a dirt road in Chavez Ravine in 1950. Photo Leonard Nadel, courtesy of the Southern California Library for Social Studies & Research.

Two children walk up a dirt road in Chavez Ravine in 1950. Photo Leonard Nadel, courtesy of the Southern California Library for Social Studies & Research.

Aerial view of Encino, circa 1920, showing the oak-dotted foothills of the Santa Monica Mountains. Courtesy of the Photo Collection, Los Angeles Public Library.

Aerial view of Encino, circa 1920, showing the oak-dotted foothills of the Santa Monica Mountains. Courtesy of the Photo Collection, Los Angeles Public Library.

Reservoir in San Francisquito Canyon that held 12.5 billion gallons of water for the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power — seen here just after the collapse of the St. Francis Dam on March 12-13, 1928. The line between dark and light represents the pre-disaster water level. The concrete dam would have been just out of view at the bottom of this photo.

Reservoir in San Francisquito Canyon that held 12.5 billion gallons of water for the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power — seen here just after the collapse of the St. Francis Dam on March 12-13, 1928. The line between dark and light represents the pre-disaster water level. The concrete dam would have been just out of view at the bottom of this photo.

(November 5, 1913)* - The water gates are finally opened and 30,000 people watch in amazement as the Los Angeles Aqueduct water starts to flow down the cascades into the San Fernando Valley.

(November 5, 1913)* - The water gates are finally opened and 30,000 people watch in amazement as the Los Angeles Aqueduct water starts to flow down the cascades into the San Fernando Valley.

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