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Frozen plains in the heart of Pluto’s ‘heart’ discovered by New Horizons spacecraft! A new close-up image of Pluto reveals a vast, craterless plain that appears to be no more than 100 million years old, and is possibly still being shaped by geologic processes. This frozen region is north of Pluto’s icy mountains, in the center-left of the heart feature.

In the center left of Pluto’s vast heart-shaped feature – informally named “Tombaugh Regio” - lies a vast, craterless plain that appears to be no more than 100 million years old, and is possibly still being shaped by geologic processes.

NASA, Plüton'daki büyük keşfi açıkladı

An image displaying deposits of water ice (displayed in blue) – the shot is a composite of visible imagery from the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) with infrared spectroscopy from the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA)

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An enlarged image of the boxed area from the previous composite. Red arrows indicate where (most likely nitrogen) ice is flowing from a mountainous area into Sputnik Planum. Blue arrows indicate the flow front of ice moving into the plain

A strip of Pluto stretching into the icy nitrogen plain of Sputnik Planum (the left side of the heart-shaped feature) that’s 80 kilometers wide and 700 kilometers long, with a resolution of about 80 meters per pixel

Incredible New High-Res Photos Reveal Pluto’s Breathtaking, Icy Surface

Pluto’s Icy Plains in Highest-Resolution Views from New Horizons ew Horizons’ highest-resolution swath of Pluto to the center of the informally named Sputnik Planum

NASA Just Released This Amazing New Set of Up-Close Pluto Pictures

NASA Just Released This Amazing New Set of Up-Close Pluto Pictures

This wide view of Pluto from NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft illustrates the incredible diversity of surface reflectivities and geological landforms on the dwarf planet

Explanation: New Horizons cameras have spied swarms of mysterious "pits" across the informally named Sputnik Planum. Scientists believe the pits may form through a combination of sublimation and ice fracturing.

Another great image of the odd pits in the nitrogen ice plains of Pluto.

First close-up pics of Pluto reveal astounding discovery. By Associated Press July 15, 2015 | 6:15pm Pluto Gets Its Closeup As 'Horizons'  Images Arrive On Earth

Icy Mountains of Pluto New close-up images of a region near Pluto’s equator reveal a giant surprise: a range of youthful mountains. New close-up images of a region near Pluto’s equator reveal a giant surprise: a range of youthful mountains.

Does Pluto Have a Subsurface Ocean? New Research Says Probably

So-called “waterworlds” have been found to be surprisingly common in the Solar System—small icy moons which have ice crusts but oceans of liquid water below the surface.

Pluto’s Bright, High-Altitude Atmospheric Haze

New Horizons Image Gallery

The twilight region on Pluto, where day meets night. - Image via NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute.

http://www.space.com/36707-mystery-of-plutos-beating-heart.html

Strange geometric shapes miles wide seen on Pluto's icy surface likely formed because of a churning sheet of frozen nitrogen more than a half-mile thick, reinforcing the idea that Pluto is not a cold and dead, but surprisingly geologically active.

Image Gallery: new Pluto images - July 24, 2015

Image Gallery: new Pluto images – July 24, 2015

Image Gallery: new Pluto images – July 2015

Mercury surface

Mercury mission ends with a bang

After a decade in space and four years in orbit, Nasa's Messenger spacecraft reaches the end of its mission and crashes into the surface of Mercury.

Transmitted to Earth on Dec. 24, 2015, this image from the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) extends New Horizons’ highest-resolution swath of Pluto to the very center of Sputnik Planum, the informally named plain that forms the left side of Pluto’s “heart.” Mission scientists believe the pattern of the cells stems from the slow thermal convection of the nitrogen-dominated ices that fill Sputnik Planum.  Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

Transmitted to Earth on Dec. 24, 2015, this image from the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) extends New Horizons’ highest-resolution swath of Pluto to the very center of Sputnik Planum, the informally named plain that forms the left side of Pluto’s “heart.” Mission scientists believe the pattern of the cells stems from the slow thermal convection of the nitrogen-dominated ices that fill Sputnik Planum. Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

NASA Just Released This Amazing New Set of Up-Close Pluto Pictures

NASA Just Released This Amazing New Set of Up-Close Pluto Pictures

Pluto view, 470 km wide. Jumbled, broken terrain on the northwestern edge of the vast, icy plain informally called Sputnik Planum, to the right. The smallest visible features are km in size.

LORRI–The Pluto Encounter | NASA

LORRI–The Pluto Encounter

Images of Pluto acquired by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) camera aboard NASA's New Horizons spacecraft.

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