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Clara Barton (1821-1912), the founder and first president of the American Red Cross, acquired her broad skill set of urgent medical care, long-term care for invalids, locating and reuniting lost family members and soldiers, etc. through “on-the-job training” during some of the bloodiest battles of the Civil War. Prior to the war, she was a schoolteacher with no medical background.

Ada Comstock (December 11, 1876-December 12, 1973) was an American women's education pioneer. She served as the first dean of women at the University of Minnesota and later as the first full-time president of Radcliffe College.

Jefferson Davis, c.1885 This photo is taken on the grounds of Beavoir, President Davis' last home in Biloxi, Mississippi.

Elizabeth Blackwell was rejected by 19+ medical schools but was finally accepted by Geneva Medical College in NY. She graduated on January 23, 1849 to become the first female doctor in history.

“Stagecoach” Mary Fields (c. 1832-1914) was born a slave in Tennessee and following the Civil War, she moved to the pioneer community of Cascade, Montana. In 1895, when she was around 60 years old, Fields became the second woman and first African American carrier for the US Postal Service. Despite her age, she never missed a day of work in the ten years she carried the mail and earned the nickname “Stagecoach” for her reliability. Fields loved the job, despite the many...

Vesta Stoudt. The mom of two sons in the Navy during WWII, she worked in an ammunition plant. She had the idea to use cloth tape to seal boxes of ammo so they could be opened in seconds while keeping the ammo dry, potentially saving the lives of soldiers when time was critical. Her bosses rejected her idea and she went straight to President Roosevelt via a written letter. A few weeks later, she received a response that the Navy was going to “fast track” her idea, and thus duct tape was born.

RUTH ODOM BONNER, DAUGHTER OF A SLAVE, OPENED NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE [VIDEO] - Ruth’s father, Elijah Odom, was born into servitude in Mississippi. He was born a slave. As a young boy, he ran to his freedom. He lived through Reconstruction and he lived through Jim Crow. But he went on to farm, and graduate from medical school and raise a family.

Louisa May Alcott, nurse during the Civil War and well known author, wrote "Little Women" #Alcott #civil_war #Little_Women