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Unmanned Ground Control at RAF Waddington (23 Photos)

UAV at RAF Waddington

Operators FLT LT Tom Maddock (L) and Master Rear Crew David Gaul sit in one of the Ground Control Stations at RAF Waddington on January 15, 2014 in Waddington, England. RAF Waddington has two Ground Control Stations operating unmanned aircraft systems in Afghanistan, including the RAF's Reaper aircraft. The unmanned aircraft systems, often referred to as drones, include current and future equipment such as Hermes 450, Black Hornet Nano, Tarantula Hawk, Watchkeeper and Scan Eagle.

An unmanned aircraft system, the Watchkeeper, sits at RAF Waddington on January 15, 2014 in Waddington, England. RAF Waddington has two Ground Control Stations operating unmanned aircraft systems in Afghanistan, including the RAF's Reaper aircraft. The unmanned aircraft systems, often referred to as drones, include current and future equipment such as Hermes 450, Black Hornet Nano, Tarantula Hawk, Watchkeeper and Scan Eagle.

Drone operations centre could be used for attacks in Middle East and Africa US Airforce assassination programme investigated by United Nations Company maintaining drone equipment has established base in Lincolnshire US staff requested to work at RAF Waddington on drone called the Predator An RAF base in Britain is being used by America in its controversial drone warfare campaign, it was claimed last night.

Unmanned Ground Control at RAF Waddington (23 Photos)

Unmanned Ground Control at RAF Waddington

Defence review: Spend more on SAS and drones - Cameron

Undated MoD handout photo of an RAF Reaper UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle).

Unmanned Ground Control at RAF Waddington (23 Photos)

Drones: What are they and how do they work?

To the military, they are UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) or RPAS (Remotely Piloted Aerial Systems). However, they are more commonly known as drones.

MPs: Drone strike law must be clearer or ministers could face murder charges - Ars Technica UK