Explore these ideas and more!

Explore related topics

A Scandinavian viking priest known as a Gothi leading the people in sacrificing to an idol of Thor in this painting by Johan Ludwig Lund

A Scandinavian viking priest known as a Gothi leading the people in sacrificing to an idol of Thor in this painting by Johan Ludwig Lund

This picture, from the Bayeux Tapestry, shows William the Conqueror feasting with his Normans. The Norman Conquest ended both Anglo-Saxon and Viking rule in England.

This picture, from the Bayeux Tapestry, shows William the Conqueror feasting with his Normans. The Norman Conquest ended both Anglo-Saxon and Viking rule in England.

In Norse mythology, Óðr (Old Norse for "mad, frantic, furious, vehement, eager", as a noun "mind, feeling" and also "song, poetry"; Orchard (1997) gives "the frenzied one"[1]) or Óð, sometimes angliziced as Odr or Od, is a figure associated with the major goddess Freyja. The Prose Edda and Heimskringla, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson, both describe Óðr as Freyja's husband and father of her daughter Hnoss. Heimskringla adds that the couple produced another daughter, Gersemi.

In Norse mythology, Óðr (Old Norse for "mad, frantic, furious, vehement, eager", as a noun "mind, feeling" and also "song, poetry"; Orchard (1997) gives "the frenzied one"[1]) or Óð, sometimes angliziced as Odr or Od, is a figure associated with the major goddess Freyja. The Prose Edda and Heimskringla, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson, both describe Óðr as Freyja's husband and father of her daughter Hnoss. Heimskringla adds that the couple produced another daughter, Gersemi.

ManuscriptBeinecke MS.229 Arthurian Romances  Folio329r  Dating1275-1300  FromFrance (exact location unknown)  Holding InstitutionYale University

ManuscriptBeinecke MS.229 Arthurian Romances Folio329r Dating1275-1300 FromFrance (exact location unknown) Holding InstitutionYale University

Hermóðr the Brave (Old Norse "war-spirit"[1], anglicized as Hermod) is a figure in Norse mythology, the son of god Odin.

Hermóðr the Brave (Old Norse "war-spirit"[1], anglicized as Hermod) is a figure in Norse mythology, the son of god Odin.

Frigg (sometimes anglicized as Frigga) is a major goddess in Norse paganism, a subset of Germanic paganism. She is said to be the wife of Odin, and is the "foremost among the goddesses" and the queen of Asgard.[1] Frigg appears primarily in Norse mythological stories as a wife and a mother.

Frigg (sometimes anglicized as Frigga) is a major goddess in Norse paganism, a subset of Germanic paganism. She is said to be the wife of Odin, and is the "foremost among the goddesses" and the queen of Asgard.[1] Frigg appears primarily in Norse mythological stories as a wife and a mother.

In Germanic mythology, Fulla (Old Norse, possibly "bountiful"[1]) or Volla (Old High German) is a goddess. In Norse mythology, Fulla is described as wearing a golden snood and as tending to the ashen box and the footwear owned by the goddess Frigg, and, in addition, Frigg confides in Fulla her secrets.

In Germanic mythology, Fulla (Old Norse, possibly "bountiful"[1]) or Volla (Old High German) is a goddess. In Norse mythology, Fulla is described as wearing a golden snood and as tending to the ashen box and the footwear owned by the goddess Frigg, and, in addition, Frigg confides in Fulla her secrets.

Forseti (Old Norse "the presiding one," actually "president" in Modern Icelandic and Faroese) is an Æsir god of justice and reconciliation in Norse mythology. He is generally identified with Fosite, a god of the Frisians. Jacob Grimm noted that if, as Adam of Bremen states, Fosite's sacred island was Heligoland, that would make him an ideal candidate for a deity known to both Frisians and Scandinavians, but that it is surprising he is never mentioned by Saxo Grammaticus.[1]

Forseti (Old Norse "the presiding one," actually "president" in Modern Icelandic and Faroese) is an Æsir god of justice and reconciliation in Norse mythology. He is generally identified with Fosite, a god of the Frisians. Jacob Grimm noted that if, as Adam of Bremen states, Fosite's sacred island was Heligoland, that would make him an ideal candidate for a deity known to both Frisians and Scandinavians, but that it is surprising he is never mentioned by Saxo Grammaticus.[1]

In Norse mythology, Gerðr (Old Norse "fenced-in"[1]) is a jötunn, goddess, and the wife of the god Freyr. Gerðr is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources; the Prose Edda and Heimskringla, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson; and in the poetry of skalds. Gerðr is sometimes modernly anglicized as Gerd or Gerth.

In Norse mythology, Gerðr (Old Norse "fenced-in"[1]) is a jötunn, goddess, and the wife of the god Freyr. Gerðr is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources; the Prose Edda and Heimskringla, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson; and in the poetry of skalds. Gerðr is sometimes modernly anglicized as Gerd or Gerth.

Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas
Search