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Continental Airlines honors its first black pilot by naming new 737 after him. 1st black pilot with Continental Airlines who had to go through the Supreme Court to get the job. Marlon Dewitt Green (June 6, 1929 – July 6, 2009) was an African-American pilot whose landmark United States Supreme Court decision in 1963 helped dismantle racial discrimination in the American passenger airline industry.. http://www.griphop.com/

Continental Airlines honors its first black pilot by naming new 737 after him

Continental Airlines honors its first black pilot by naming new 737 after him. 1st black pilot with Continental Airlines who had to go through the Supreme Court to get the job. Marlon Dewitt Green (June 6, 1929 – July 6, 2009) was an African-American pilot whose landmark United States Supreme Court decision in 1963 helped dismantle racial discrimination in the American passenger airline industry.. http://www.griphop.com/

The 'BRASS ANKLES', an ethnic group of SOUTH CAROLINA "were a "tri-racial isolate" group who lived in the area of Orangeburg County, Berkeley County and Charleston County from the early 1800s to the mid 1900s. They were a mixture of AFRICAN, NATIVE AMERICAN and EUROPEAN descent. Common surnames were Russell, Jackson, Driggers, Goins, Bunch, Sweat and Weatherford.

The 'BRASS ANKLES', an ethnic group of SOUTH CAROLINA "were a "tri-racial isolate" group who lived in the area of Orangeburg County, Berkeley County and Charleston County from the early 1800s to the mid 1900s. They were a mixture of AFRICAN, NATIVE AMERICAN and EUROPEAN descent. Common surnames were Russell, Jackson, Driggers, Goins, Bunch, Sweat and Weatherford.

March 5 1945, Lena Baker, an African-American mother of three, was electrocuted at the Georgia State Prison in Reidsyille.    She was convicted for the fatal shooting of E. B. Knight, a white Cuthbert, GA mill operator she was hired to care for after he broke his leg. She was 44 and the only woman ever executed in Georgia’s electric chair.

March 5 1945, Lena Baker, an African-American mother of three, was electrocuted at the Georgia State Prison in Reidsyille. She was convicted for the fatal shooting of E. B. Knight, a white Cuthbert, GA mill operator she was hired to care for after he broke his leg. She was 44 and the only woman ever executed in Georgia’s electric chair.

Lena Baker (June 8, 1901 – March 5, 1945) was an African American maid who was executed for murder by the State of Georgia in 1945 for killing her employer, Ernest Knight, in 1944. At her trial she said that he had imprisoned and threatened to shoot her should she try to leave. She took his gun and shot him. Baker was the only woman to be executed by electrocution in Georgia. In 2005 Baker was granted a full and unconditional pardon by the State of Georgia, 60 years after her execution.

Lena Baker (June 8, 1901 – March 5, 1945) was an African American maid who was executed for murder by the State of Georgia in 1945 for killing her employer, Ernest Knight, in 1944. At her trial she said that he had imprisoned and threatened to shoot her should she try to leave. She took his gun and shot him. Baker was the only woman to be executed by electrocution in Georgia. In 2005 Baker was granted a full and unconditional pardon by the State of Georgia, 60 years after her execution.

Lives of Passion and Purpose Vancouver Public Library Wednesday Sept. 11, 2013 6:30 pm A reading and talk in commemoration of the 40th Anniversary of the Military Coup in Chile. With Mother and Daughter Carmen Rodríguez and Carmen Aguirre. Alma Vandusen and Peter Kaye Rooms, Lower Library, Central Library. 350 West Georgia St. Admission is free. Seating is limited.

Lives of Passion and Purpose Vancouver Public Library Wednesday Sept. 11, 2013 6:30 pm A reading and talk in commemoration of the 40th Anniversary of the Military Coup in Chile. With Mother and Daughter Carmen Rodríguez and Carmen Aguirre. Alma Vandusen and Peter Kaye Rooms, Lower Library, Central Library. 350 West Georgia St. Admission is free. Seating is limited.

The Tuskegee Syphilis Project  Black History Fact: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment began 1932 til 1972. Approximately 600 black men were involved. The experiment was called "Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male." The experiment was conducted without the patient's consent. The men were never given treatment for their disease, even when penicillin became the drug of choice for syphilis in 1947

The Tuskegee Syphilis Project Black History Fact: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment began 1932 til 1972. Approximately 600 black men were involved. The experiment was called "Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male." The experiment was conducted without the patient's consent. The men were never given treatment for their disease, even when penicillin became the drug of choice for syphilis in 1947

US Slave: “We Are Literally Slaves”: An Early Twentieth-Century Black Nanny Sets the Record Straight   POWERFUL information!  Please take the time to go to this site and read the article in full!  © Raynetta Manees, author

US Slave: “We Are Literally Slaves”: An Early Twentieth-Century Black Nanny Sets the Record Straight POWERFUL information! Please take the time to go to this site and read the article in full! © Raynetta Manees, author

Jim Beckwourth was an African American who played a major role in the early exploration and settlement of the American West. Although there were people of many races and nationalities on the frontier, Beckwourth was the only African American who recorded his life story, and his adventures took him from the everglades of Florida to the Pacific Ocean and from southern Canada to northern Mexico.

Jim Beckwourth was an African American who played a major role in the early exploration and settlement of the American West. Although there were people of many races and nationalities on the frontier, Beckwourth was the only African American who recorded his life story, and his adventures took him from the everglades of Florida to the Pacific Ocean and from southern Canada to northern Mexico.

Charlotte Manye was 17 when the African Choir arrived in London .Later she received a scholarship at Wilberforce U. in Ohio, where she became the first South African woman to earn a PhD in humanities, and married Dr. Marshall Maxeke. She helped found the Bantu Women’s League, educated thousands of young Africans, and was a key member of the African National Congress who wrote much of their early literature, and a passionate, lifelong advocate for African liberty and women's rights.

Charlotte Manye was 17 when the African Choir arrived in London .Later she received a scholarship at Wilberforce U. in Ohio, where she became the first South African woman to earn a PhD in humanities, and married Dr. Marshall Maxeke. She helped found the Bantu Women’s League, educated thousands of young Africans, and was a key member of the African National Congress who wrote much of their early literature, and a passionate, lifelong advocate for African liberty and women's rights.

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