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  • Maryam Thani

    Ars Moriendi (The Art of Dying) Published/ Created in Paris, for Andre? Bocard, 12 Feb. 1453. The Ars Moriendi, or "art of dying," is a body of Christian literature that provided practical guidance for the dying and those attending them. These manuals informed the dying about what to expect, and prescribed prayers, actions, and attitudes that would lead to a "good death" and salvation. The first such works appeared in Europe during the early fifteenth century, and they initiated a remarkably flexible genre of Christian writing that lasted well into the eighteenth century.

  • Simone Koster

    Ars Moriendi, by Assaf Kintzer

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