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  • Rose G

    Courtesy of the Chicago Public Library Tumblr, this is the library card signed by Elvis Presley in 1948, when the rock icon was only 13 years old. Because it’s believed to be the earliest known signature of the King, the autograph fetched $7,500 at auction last summer, more than twice the original asking price. As for what was young Elvis reading, you’re wondering? It’s The Courageous Heart: A Life of Andrew Jackson for Young Readers. h/t @kirstinbutler

  • Janne

    Borrowers card for library book - Elvis Presley

  • Sinae Lee

    Elvis Presley’s library card from 1948 when the thirteen-year-old checked out Bessie Rowland and Marquis James’s The Courageous Heart: A Life of Andrew Jackson for Young Readers from Humes High School in Memphis, Tennessee.

  • Houston Foodlovers

    In 1948, when Elvis Presley was just 13 years old, he checked out a copy of The Courageous Heart: A Life of Andrew Jackson out from his school library in Memphis, Tennessee. The card was found by a librarian going through some discards, and will be up for public auction this August. Starting bid? Around 4,000.00.

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Before there were computers, books were checked out this way.