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ISS012-E-21343 (29 Mar. 2006) --- The shadow of the moon falls on Earth as seen from the International Space Station, 230 miles above the planet, during a total solar eclipse at about 4:50 a.m. CST Wednesday, March 29. This digital photo was taken by the Expedition 12 crew, Commander Bill McArthur and Flight Engineer Valery Tokarev, who are wrapping up a six-month mission on the complex. Visible near the shadow are portions of Cyprus in the Mediterranean Sea and the coast of Turkey.

Earth Observatory - Total Solar Eclipse of March 29, 2006: "The International Space Station (ISS) was in position to view the umbral (ground) shadow cast by the Moon as it moved between the Sun and the Earth during the solar eclipse on March 29, 2006. This astronaut image captures the umbral shadow across southern Turkey, northern Cyprus, and the Mediterranean Sea..."

APOD - August 30, 1999: "Here is what the Earth looks like during a solar eclipse. The shadow of the Moon can be seen darkening part of Earth. This shadow moves across the Earth at nearly 2000 kilometers per hour. Only observers near the center of the dark circle see a total solar eclipse - others see a partial eclipse where only part of the Sun appears blocked by the Moon. This spectacular picture of the 1999 August 11 solar eclipse was one of the last ever taken from the Mir space station…

Aurora borealis as seen from the International Space Station.

Enceladus, one of Saturns moons.

Aurora seen from the International Space Station

NASA's MESSENGER Satellite Captures Spectacular Color Mosaic of Mercury by NASA Goddard Photo and Video, via Flickr

Neil Armstrong getting suited up for his Gemini 8 mission. This is where he learned orbital docking for the moon mission. March, 1966.

The Mineral Moon (NASA/JPL) - this mosaic of 53 images was recorded by the Jupiter-bound Galileo spacecraft as it passed near our own large natural satellite in 1992. The pictures were recorded through three spectral filters and combined in an exaggerated false-color scheme to explore the composition of the lunar surface as changes in mineral content produce subtle color differences in reflected light.