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Helga Kann, little German Jewish girl. Photo taken before WW2, nothing else is known. She likely perished in the Holocaust.

BBC Newsfrom BBC News

Holocaust survivor Henia Bryer: Prisoner number A26188

Holocaust survivor Henia Bryer: Now in her 80s, she fears younger generations lack knowledge of the Holocaust. "I had an operation once and the anaesthetist comes and looks at [the tattoo on] my arm and he says, 'What is this?' And I said, 'That's from Auschwitz.' And he said, 'Auschwitz, what was that?' And that was a young man, a qualified doctor," she says.

Ramani's blogfrom Ramani's blog

Holocaust Auschwitz Concentration Camp Medical Experiments

Holocaust Auschwitz Concentration Camp Medical Experiments Holocaust Auschwitz Toplama Kampı Tıbbi Deneylerinden...

"In 1939, right after the Germans invaded, Warsaw began to see trainloads of blonde, blue-eyed children being taken to "Germanization" camps in Germany. Everyone in Warsaw knew about a certain group of women...when the trains pulled in, they tried to convince the German guards to accept bribes in exchange for some of the children." Irena Sendler was one of these women. Later she did everything she could to save Jewish children, including the ones in this photo. (1944)

Mail Onlinefrom Mail Online

Hero prisoner who escaped Auschwitz with girlfriend by dressing as S.S. officer before reuniting four decades later dies aged 90

After falling in love & escaping Auschwitz together, this couple was separated in the midst of World War II. "While talking with her Polish cleaning woman in 1982, Ms Cybulska related her Auschwitz escape story. The stunned woman said she had heard Mr Bielecki tell the same story on Polish TV. She then helped Ms Cybulska find Mr Bielecki in Poland. In the summer of 1983, they met at the Krakow airport. He brought 39 red roses, one for each year they had spent apart."

65 years after the war’s end, the u.s. holocaust memorial museum has undertaken a remarkable and poignant task: identify the more than 1,100 children in these photos, and find out what happened to them. (rw)

Elizabeth of Bavaria, Queen of Belgium. During WWI established a hospital and worked as a nurse caring for soldiers and civilians. During WWII German occupation of Belgium she used her influence as Queen and German connections to assist in rescuing hundreds of Jewish children from the Nazis for which she was awarded the title Righteous Among the Nations by the Israeli government

Irene Sendler, the 97-year-old Polish woman who saved 2,500 Jewish children during the holocaust.

Mail Onlinefrom Mail Online

The little ones that got away: Incredible stories of Jewish children who survived the Nazi holocaust

Children of the holocaust and their stories | ... Incredible stories of Jewish children who survived the Nazi holocaust in a new book entitled "You Don't Get Us".

1933, Nazi Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels (seated). Alfred Eisenstaedt (the photographer) recalled that Goebbels smiled at him until he learned that Eisenstaedt was Jewish -- a moment Eisenstaedt captured in this photo. Suddenly, "he looked at me with hateful eyes and waited for me to wither," the photographer recalled. "But I didn't wither." Not only didn't he wither, but he managed to take perhaps the most chilling portrait of pure evil. CREEPY.

On the 70th Anniversary of the Execution of Sophie Scholl, 22 February 1943 - Sophie Scholl was a German woman executed by the Nazis for distributing anti-Nazi pamphlets. Prison officials, in later describing the scene, emphasized the courage with which she walked to her execution. Her last words were: "How can we expect righteousness to prevail when there is hardly anyone willing to offer themselves up individually for a righteous cause? Such a fine, sunny day, and I have to go."

A group of young children gaze out at the photographer just prior to their execution by an Einsatzkommando. An estimated one million Jewish children died in the Holocaust, most of them in the gas chambers of the death camps. As the Germans swept into Soviet territory, they sometimes turned the task of killing Jewish children over to their Ukrainian allies.

Irena Sendler smuggled some 2,500 Jewish children out of the Warsaw Ghetto and then provided them with false identity documents and with housing outside the Ghetto, saving those children during the Holocaust.[5]

Soon after liberation, surviving children of the Auschwitz camp walk out of the children's barracks. Poland, after January 27, 1945. — US Holocaust Memorial Museum

Bronka Klibanski, 1942. Jewish resistance. She obtained critical weapons for the Bialystok ghetto revolt, gathered intelligence, rescued other Jews and saved the secret archive of the ghetto; continued her underground activities after the Bialystok ghetto was destroyed, working with five young women to continue rescuing & helping Jews. They also smuggled weapons, supplies and medicine to the partisans in the forests near Bialystok, and were awarded medals as heroines of the USSR after the…

Martin Bormann, Jr. (1930 - Present) seen in uniform in 1939. This is the eldest son of Martin Bormann, Hitler's private secretary. Martin was a godson of Adolf Hitler. He has spent much of his life repenting for his father’s horrific actions, becoming a Catholic priest and serving as a missionary in the Belgian Congo. He has also joined with Jewish groups to make a pilgrimage to Auschwitz and traveled to Israel to meet Holocaust survivors.

Frank Sinatra was a big activist in the civil rights movement, refusing to stay at hotels that didn't allow "blacks". Even using his mafia ties to help get labor unions behind JFK because he knew they shared the same opinions on equal rights.

Milena Jesenska, Czech journalist, writer, editor and translator, who refused to abandon her Jewish friends and was deported with several of them to Ravensbruck concentration camp, where she died.