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  • T. Benson

    This is a true color image of Jupiter’s moon Io. Io is home to over 400 active volcanoes, making it the most geologically active body in our solar system. Lava flows over its surface, and the atmosphere is mostly comprised of sulphur dioxide.

  • neener neener

    The strangest moon in the Solar System is bright yellow. This picture, an attempt to show how Io would appear in the "true colors" perceptible to the average human eye, was taken in 1999 July by the Galileo spacecraft that orbited Jupiter from 1995 to 2003. Io's colors derive from sulfur and molten silicate rock. Some of Io's volcanic lava is so hot it glows in the dark. No wonder they say the moon is made of cheese.

  • Jennifer Olson

    Io, Jupiter’s most interesting moon. It is not the Earth but Jupiter’s innermost moon, Io, which is the most volcanically active body in our Solar System. Between 1995 and 2003, the space probe Galileo was able to detect around 120 volcanoes that shoot gas and dust up to a height of 400 kilometres. On average, every one hundred years the material emitted forms an approximately one centimetre thick layer all over Io, so that the surface is continually changing. Lava flows up to 300 kilometres long and with temperatures of 1500 degrees Celsius, containing sulphurous material and melted silicates, run over the surface. Various sulphur compounds are responsible for the reddish-yellow colouration. Where does the energy required for volcanism come from? On its orbit, Io is subject to the influences of the gravitational fields of Jupiter and the neighbouring moons Europa and Ganymede. Together with Io they orbit the planet in resonance – during one Ganymede orbit, Europa orbits Jupiter twice and Io three times. Thus, the three moons are regularly positioned in a line and the two outer moons exert a combined force on Io, their innermost partner. At the same time, Jupiter pulls much more strongly in the opposite direction and this leads to a strong tidal force. One the one hand, this causes an approximately one hundred metre-high bulge in the crust to move across Io’s surface like a flood wave. On the other hand, the interior of the moon is kneaded like dough. In the process, the material heats up so much that it melts and becomes lava, powering explosive volcanoes.

  • iNews Photo

    Jupiter's Moon Io Was Rocked By 3 Massive Volcanoes Last August - INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS TIMES #Jupiter, #Moon, #Volcanoes, #Space

  • Michael Grosen

    Io in True Color ~ The strangest moon in the Solar System is bright yellow. This picture, an attempt to show how Io would appear in the "true colors" perceptible to the average human eye, was taken in 1999 July by the Galileo spacecraft that orbited Jupiter from 1995 to 2003. Io's colors derive from sulfur and molten silicate rock. The unusual surface of Io is kept very young by its system of active volcanoes.

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Jupiter and Io. "The image shows a major eruption in progress on Io's night side, at the northern volcano Tvashtar. Incandescent lava glows red beneath a high volcanic plume, whose uppermost portions are illuminated by sunlight. The plume appears blue due to scattering of light by small particles in the plume."

Jupiter and Its Moons Photograph courtesy NASA This family portrait, a composite of the Jovian system, includes the edge of Jupiter (with the Great Red Spot visible) and Jupiter's four largest moons, known as the Galilean satellites. From top to bottom are Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. The smallest of these four moons, Europa is about the size of Earth's moon.

Jupiter has 64 moons, and from top to bottom, the moons shown are Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto.

Based on new evidence from Jupiters moon Europa, astronomers hypothesize that chloride salts bubble up from the icy moons global liquid ocean and reach the frozen surface where they are bombarded with sulfur from volcanoes on Jupiters moon Io. credit : NASA/JPL-CalTech

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Io, one of Jupiter's many moons and larger than our own. With over 400 active volcanoes, Io is the most geologically active object in the Solar System. This extreme geologic activity is the result of tidal heating from friction generated within Io's interior as it is pulled between Jupiter and its moons Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. Several volcanoes produce plumes that climb as high as 300 miles above the surface. Io has more than 100 mountains, some of which are taller than Mount Everest.

Io: Moon Over Jupiter 8 April 2012 Astronomy Picture of the Day This Cassini photo shows Jupiter's moon, Io. Io is the most volcanic body in the solar system and is about the size of Earth's moon.

Jupiter and its moon Io. Io's shadow is visible on the planet's surface. (Hubble)

Io’s interior is composed of molten iron sulphide, and the surface is a crust of sulfur and silicon.  Io has more than 400 active volcanoes, which can eject lava plumes more than 500 kilometers above the surface.

True color image of volcanic basalt rocks in the Gusev Crater, Mars.