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Although she may have been one of the toughest women ever to work in a convent, ‘Black Mary’ had earned the respect and devotion of most of the residents of the pioneer community of Cascade, Montana, before she died in 1914. In fact, Mary Fields was widely beloved. She was admired and respected throughout the region for holding her own and living her own way in a world where the odds were stacked against her. In a time when African Americans and women of any race enjoyed little f

Mary Fields, c. Mary Fields, also known as Stagecoach Mary (c. was the first African-American woman employed as a mail carrier in the United and just the second American woman to work for the United States Postal Service.

Children at Tea Party 1902

This picture was taken in and it shows children enjoying a tea party.Little girls have always loved tea parties.

"Many Native Americans welcomed African Americans into their villages. Even as slaves many African Americans became part of a family group, and many intermarried with Native Americans. Many later became classified as Black Indians"

FAMILY Many Native Americans welcomed African Americans into their villages. Even as slaves many African Americans became part of a family group, and many intermarried with Native Americans - thus many later became classified as Black Indians

Nothing but heartache. The cruelty is unbearable.

Poster announcing sale of slaves in the USA. to be sold cargo prime healthy negroes, black slavery slaves, February 2015 old vintage photograph

Aleatorio   : Misterios sin resolver

The Melungeons ) are a mixed-race people in America who live in the Appalachian mountains where Tennessee meets Virginia meets Kentucky. In the French traders said they looked like Moors.

Phillis Wheathley monument The first African-American poet and first African-American woman to publish a book in the United States.

Phyllis Wheatley, born in Boston MA. an eighteenth-century African-American woman who was a slave and a poet, was the first black American to be published.First African American woman to be published

Susan McKinney Steward (born March 18, 1847) was the first Black woman in New York State to become an MD. Dr Steward practiced in Brooklyn, throughout the west while accompanying her husband (an Army chaplain), and at Wilberforce University in Ohio. In 1911 she addressed the first Universal Race Congress at the University of London. #TodayInBlackHistory

Susan Smith McKinney Steward was the first Black American woman to earn a medical doctorate (M.) in New York State and the third in the United States.

Dr. Barbara Ross-Lee, sister of Diana Ross of The Supremes, became the first African American to be appointed dean of a predominantly white medical school in the United States. In 1993, Ross-Lee became the first African American woman dean of a United States medical school. She remained dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine of Ohio University until 2001.

In Dr. Barbara Ross-Lee, sister of Diana Ross of The Supremes,became the first African American woman to be appointed dean of a United States medical school. She remained dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine of Ohio University until

En 1939, un hombre llamado Tiburcio Medina de un pequeño pueblo en las montañas de los Andes llevó a su hija de cinco años de edad, Lina, a un hospital en

Youngest girl to ever give birth, Lina Medina. She was 5 years, 7 months and 21 days old when she gave birth to a baby boy in The doctor is her son's namesake, Gerardo. It's still a mystery as to who impregnated her.

Dr. Dorothy Lavinia Brown  was the first African American woman surgeon in the South.

Dorothy Lavinia Brown was a Bennett and Meharry alum who was the first African American woman surgeon in the South as well as the first African American woman to serve in the Tennessee state legislature.

Dr. Alexa Canady became the first african american woman neurosurgeon in 1981.

Alexa Canady became the first African-American woman neurosurgeon in the United States in From 1987 to Canady was chief of neurosurgery at Children's Hospital of Michigan. In less than 10 percent of all medical students were women.

Annie Malone,1927 the country's first African American millionaire.  Malone built a very successful business creating haircare  products  for African American women.  In 1918, Malone established Poro College in north St. Louis, a trade  school to train beauticians and barbers as well as secretaries & bookkeepers to work on the marketing side of the business.  Poro was so successful that by the 1930s Malone was one of the wealthiest women in the world.  Missouri History Museum.

Annie the country's first African American millionaire. Malone built a very successful business creating haircare products for African American women. In Malone established Poro College in north St. Louis, a trade school to train be

Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield (1824-1876) was called "the Black Swan" because of the elegance of her voice and grace of her state presence. Born a slave in Natchez, MS, she was freed when her mistress joined the Society of Friends. She began studying music in 1846. In 1854, she became the first African American singer to perform for Britain's royal family.

Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield dubbed "The Black Swan", was an African-American singer considered the best-known black concert artist of her time

Before Madam C.J. Walker there was Annie Turnbo Malone, " The Forgotten Entrepreneur" (1869-1957)  A chemist and entrepreneur, Annie Turnbo Malone became a millionaire by successfully developing and marketing hair products for black women in St. Louis. She used her wealth to promote the advancement of African Americans and gave away most of her money to charity.

Annie Malone: First African American Female Millionaire .Yes, Annie Malone was the first African American Female Millionaire, not Madame C. Malone was Madame Walker's mentor. ~Via Nautilus Salvage