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Archaeologists explored a tomb near Thebes in 2005 and discovered an artificial big toe attached to the foot of a mummy. The fake body part could prove to be the earliest working prosthetic body part to date.

Researchers have suspected that two Egyptian artificial toes are the world's oldest known prosthetic body parts. Volunteers without a big toe in a new study showed that the prosthetics would have made walking around in ancient Egyptian sandals.

Why we call it "the living room": In years passed, it was the habit to hold a deceased person's viewing and wake at home in the front parlor. During that time it was referred to as "the death room". The Ladies Home Journal in 1910 declared the "Death Room" as no more and henceforth the parlor would be known as the "Living Room".

It was the habit to hold the viewing and wake at home in the front parlor -- it was referred to as "the death room". The Ladies Home Journal in 1910 declared henceforth the parlor would be known as the "Living Room".

Ointment jar and lid naming Thutmose III  Period: New Kingdom Dynasty: Dynasty 18 Reign: reign of Thutmose III Date: ca. 1479–1425 B.C. Geography: Egypt, Upper Egypt; Thebes, Wadi Gabbanat el-Qurud, Tomb of the 3 Foreign Wives of Thutmose III, Wadi D, Tomb 1 Medium: Serpentine, gold leaf

Ointment jar and lid naming Thutmose III. New Kingdom, Dynasty, reign of Thutmose III, ca.

Feodor Vassilyev  (c. 1707-1782) was a peasant from Shuya, Russia - His first wife, Mrs. Vassilyev sets the record for most children birthed by a single woman giving birth to a total of 69 children - few other details are known of her life, such as her date of birth or death - She gave birth to 16 pairs of twins, 7 sets of triplets and 4 sets of quadruplets between 1725 and 1765, in a total of 27 births - 67 of the 69 children born are said to have survived infancy

Feodor Vassilyev (c. was a peasant from Shuya, Russia. His first wife, Mrs. Vassilyev sets the record for most children birthed by a single woman. She gave birth to a total of 69 children; however, few other details are known of her life, s

the woman who wore the above prosthetic lost her nose in the middle of the 19th century due to a raging case of syphilis.

A silver prosthetic nose from the century. Syphilis caused the destruction of the nose, which gave rise to 'No-nose clubs'. This one was worn by a woman who had lost hers to the disease Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons

Cephalotribe; obstetric tool, Geneva, Switzerland, 1750-1850 to save mother. The instrument pierced and crushed the fetus head to extract it from the mother’s body. They were used as a last resort only after the fetus was dead.

obstetric tool, Geneva, Switzerland, to save mother. The instrument pierced and crushed the fetus head to extract it from the mother’s body. They were used as a last resort only after the fetus was dead.

Breast washer, c.1930s

The Boob Washer - Here we have a strange gizmo for women, who for some reason incomprehensible for the rest of us, wanted to wash their breasts without the inconvenience of washing the rest of the body.hahah the boob washer!

Victorian Artificial Arm, 1850-1910. - I had no idea there had been stuff like this.

150 Year Old Victorian Prosthetic Hand. - History was already steampunk!

1890 antique anatomical model of the heart

1890 antique anatomical model of the heart by Bock-Steger, Lips [Leipzig]. The plaster model is over-life-size and stands cm high.

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