Explore Water Sources, American Artists, and more!

Richard Taddei (New York, 1946 - Living) - The Water Source, 2014

Richard Taddei (New York, 1946 - Living) - The Water Source, 2014

an out-of-this-world experience from the confines of a modest room paneled with mirrors and adorned with 150 tiny beads of light deliberately suspended throughout the compact space. Upon entering the room, there's an illusionary effect that gives the impression of infinite space reflected on all sides and in the two inches of water that flows below.

Spectacular Fireflies on the Water Light Exhibit

Yayoi Kusama (b. Fireflies on the Water, © Yayoi Kusama. Photograph courtesy Robert Miller Gallery This installation, one of Kusama’s “infinity mirror rooms,” was originally shown in the 2004 Whitney Biennial and is part of the Whitney’s collection.

Surrealism

Surreal Paintings by Rafel Olbinski

Surreal Paintings by Rafel Olbinski. Rafal was born in the city of Kielce in…

Lorraine Shemesh (American)

An incredible modern artist who paints huge larger than life hyper-real oil paintings. Her swimming portraits are stunning!

Contemporary Allegorical Realistic Paintings by Kevin Sloan

Inspired by the artists of century Martin Johnson Heade, and John James Audubon, American artist Kevin Sloan has been creating allegorical art of magical realism for many years.

Water Blue Coffee Cup by Jason Silverman Ceramics. Rhode Island School of Design trained artist Jason Silverman creates forms on the wheel with a combination of traditional techniques and his own contemporary vision. He draws from many modern sources in ceramics as well as other media such as blown glass and turned wood. The act of throwing, forming the clay on the wheel, is only the first step in the complex process of matching both form and glaze to an aesthetic vision.

Water Blue Coffee Cup by Jason Silverman Ceramics. Rhode Island School of Design trained artist Jason Silverman creates forms on the wheel with a combination of traditional techniques and his own contemporary vision. He draws from many modern sources in ceramics as well as other media such as blown glass and turned wood. The act of throwing, forming the clay on the wheel, is only the first step in the complex process of matching both form and glaze to an aesthetic vision.

Hale Woodruff (American, 1900-1980), Twilight, c.1926. Oil on pressed paperboard, 28 x 32 in. source

Hale Woodruff (American, Twilight, Oil on pressed paperboard. The Art Institute of Chicago.

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