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Camellia: This is a tall shrub can develop into small trees in warm climates. They bloom in spring and summer. Looks great against walls. Plant in part sun to shade areas in moist well-drained soil. Grows to 20ft by 20ft.

Camellia japonica 'Lila Naff Variegated' (U.S., 1967)

Drift roses are becoming a favorite with me... as reliable as Knock-out/Double Knock-out! Low growing and spreading LOVE LOVE LOVE Snowdrift Rose

Nice chart for companion planting. Companion planting helps reduce the need for pesticides and other chemicals by taking advantage of the natural plant interactions.

7 tips for growing giant basil plants- I always kill my basil.... The one that lived got aphids. Stupid. Maybe this will help!

Camellia japonica 'Elegans Splendor' (U.S., 1971)

Don't let this little beauty fool you -- though it's small, lily-of-the-valley packs a big fragrance in its nodding white or pink bell-shape flowers. It's a tough, low-care groundcover you can practically plant and forget in shady spots.

Little Mischief Shrub Rose Grow low-care 'Little Mischief' for a burst of hot pink flowers all summer. It's heat and disease resistant, too, so you can enjoy it in any kind of weather.

Keep it simple and make a statement outdoors. Layer pots planted with single plants in various hues and textures

Lily-of-the-Valley/ Very Fragrant, will attract Butterflies and Hummingbirds. Plant with "White" Moonflower Vine which is also fragrant and a white midnight garden plant. WARNING-berries are poisonous, spreads quickly and never plant under SHALLOW rooted trees, they'll compete for water and nutrients.

Meadowsweet : Meadowsweet looks like a supersized astilbe with its cotton-candy blooms of fluffy pink borne on 5-foot-tall stems. The plant is also known as queen-of-the-prairie, a fitting name for this Midwest native. It grows best in full sun, but it tolerates some shade.