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Akechi Mitsuhide, nicknamed Jūbei or called Koretō Hyūga no Kami from his clan name and title, was a samurai who lived during the Sengoku period of Feudal Japan.

Akechi Mitsuhide, nicknamed Jūbei or called Koretō Hyūga no Kami from his clan name and title, was a samurai who lived during the Sengoku period of Feudal Japan.

Sanada Masayuki, 1547-1611.  Takeda retainer who established the Sanada as an independent clan under Hideyoshi.  Though, he backed the wrong side at Sekigahara, because he had directed one of his sons to serve with Ieyasu, the Sanada were able to survive. Though, Masayuki was sent into exile in Kudoyama in Kii province.

Sanada Masayuki, 1547-1611. Takeda retainer who established the Sanada as an independent clan under Hideyoshi. Though, he backed the wrong side at Sekigahara, because he had directed one of his sons to serve with Ieyasu, the Sanada were able to survive. Though, Masayuki was sent into exile in Kudoyama in Kii province.

織田信長の軍隊と帝国陸軍対決したらどちらが勝つか

織田信長の軍隊と帝国陸軍対決したらどちらが勝つか

Nakaoka Shintarō (中岡 慎太郎 May 6, 1838 – December 12, 1867) was a samurai in Bakumatsu period Japan, and a close associate of Sakamoto Ryōma in the movement to overthrow the Tokugawa shogunate. December 10, 1867 he travelled to Kyoto for discussions with Sakamoto Ryōma, but was killed together with Sakamoto when unknown assailants attacked their lodgings (i.e. the "Ōmiya Incident").

Nakaoka Shintarō (中岡 慎太郎 May 6, 1838 – December 12, 1867) was a samurai in Bakumatsu period Japan, and a close associate of Sakamoto Ryōma in the movement to overthrow the Tokugawa shogunate. December 10, 1867 he travelled to Kyoto for discussions with Sakamoto Ryōma, but was killed together with Sakamoto when unknown assailants attacked their lodgings (i.e. the "Ōmiya Incident").

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