Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas

Explore Wildlife Shared, Belzebul'S Bee, and more!

Texas Parks and Wildlife shared Sharon Curcio Grimes's photo. This looks like a Bumblebee but it's actually a Belzebul's Bee-eater, a species of Robber fly that preys on other insects.

Texas Parks and Wildlife shared Texas Wildlife Diversity Program - Texas Parks and Wildlife Dept's photo. Do you know what this is? Fall is a good time to search for these without creating a disturbance. We'll post the answer shortly.

Texas Parks and Wildlife shared Brooke Day-Wallace's photo. Can you spot the little guy? Most Horned Lizard species lay eggs in warmer weather. This one’s been hatched for a while. If you spot one of these threatened species, report it

Texas Parks and Wildlife shared Linda Petru Follis's photo. A Mississippi Kite and her fledgling near a campsite at Texas Parks and Wildlife - Buescher State Park near Austin.

Texas Parks and Wildlife shared Texas Parks and Wildlife - Franklin Mountains State Park's photo. Check out this colorful Rainbow Grasshopper, found in the western US. http://bugguide.net/node/view/31526

Texas Parks and Wildlife shared Carol Leonardi Clark's photo. The hairy body of this American Bumblebee carries lots of pollen

Texas Parks and Wildlife shared Texas Parks and Wildlife - Tyler State Park's photo. Noticing more toads lately? What kid can resist...

Texas Parks and Wildlife via Friends of Brazoria Wildlife Refuges A bird species never before spotted in Texas is creating a stir: Look, up in the sky! Rare bird becomes Texas tourist attraction www.khou.com

Texas Parks and Wildlife shared Texas Wildlife Diversity Program - Texas Parks and Wildlife Dept's photo. This Ghost Crab had its burrow invaded by Red Imported Fire Ants. These non-native ants were spread by ships in the 1930s and have been causing problems for native wildlife ever since. See Fire Ant FAQs at http://fireant.tamu.edu/about/faq.php

Texas Parks and Wildlife shared Bobby Jones's photo. Can you see the pollen baskets on this bumblebee's legs? Only females collect pollen, which they carry back to their colonies. More at Texas Bumblebees. This photo snapped at Texas Parks and Wildlife - San Jacinto Battleground/Battleship TEXAS SHS near Houston.