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  • Maya Sause

    Excellent WWF short

  • Ogilvy Trends

    As humans live increasingly urban lives, they lose their connection to the natural world around them. Many of the large, biodiversity campaign groups have recognised this and created communications that try and recreate this emotional link. The news: This week was about Benedict Cumberbatch as an otter. Ogilvy was ahead of this trend with its ‘Side by Side’ campaign for WWF. For celebrities as animals: http://redscharlach.tumblr.com/ For our WWF 'Side by Side' video: http://ow.ly/9Ql5I

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