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Amy Anderson
Amy Anderson • 1 year ago

Varosha is in the Turkish occupied city of Famagusta in Cyprus. It was previously a modern tourist area. In the year of 1974 however, the Turkish invaded Cyprus and tore up the island. Citizens fled, expecting to be able to return to their homes. The Turkish military wrapped it in barbed wire and now controls it completely. Allowing nobody to enter to this day, aside from themselves and UN personnel. Though on the positive side, rare sea turtles have begun nesting on the deserted beaches.

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One of several ghost cities of Eurasia, the abandoned resort of Varosha in Famagusta was once Northern Cyprus’ most exclusive tourist destination frequented by the likes of Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton and Brigitte Bardot. But since the 1974 Turkish invasion of Cypress, the Varosha quarter has been abandoned, its hotels, restaurants and highrise structures slowly decaying amid the ruins of this once thriving millionaires’ playground.

9. Varosha, Famagusta, Cyprus This lovely beachside resort in Famagusta, Cyprus once catered to members of high society. The jet set, and celebrities like Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, stayed in the Varosha quarter of this city. Written by: Michele Collet

Varosha, Famagusta, Northern Cyprus

Abandoned resort of Varosha located in the city of Famagusta within Northern Cyprus.

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