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In Norse mythology the Dísir are ancestral spirits described as "dead women" in grand attire who visit dreams.

In Norse mythology, Nótt (Old Norse "night") is night personified, grandmother of Thor. In stanza 30 of the poem Alvíssmál, Thor asks the dwarf Alvíss to tell him what night is called in each of the nine worlds, whom "Nórr" birthed. Alvíss responds that night is referred as "night" by mankind, "darkness" by the gods, "the masker by the mighty Powers", "unlight" by the jötunn, "joy-of-sleep" by the elves, while dwarves call her "dream-Njörun" (meaning "dream-goddess").

The Morrigan is a goddess of battle, strife, and fertility. Her name translates as either "Great Queen" or "Phantom Queen." The Morrigan appears as both a single goddess and a trio of goddesses. The other deities who form the trio are Badb ("Crow"), and either Macha (also connotes "Crow") or Nemain ("Frenzy"). The Morrigan frequently appears in the ornithological guise of a hooded crow. She is one of the Tuatha Dé Danann ("Tribe of the goddess Danu"). here with bees.

Rakshas by GaudiBuendia: A Rakshasa is said to be a mythological humanoid being or unrighteous spirit in Hinduism. As mythology made its way into other religions, the rakshasa was later incorporated into Buddhism. Rakshasas are also called man-eaters (Nri-chakshas, Kravyads). A female rakshasa is called a Rakshasi, and a female Rakshasa in human form is a Manushya-Rakshasi. Often Asura and Rakshasa are interchangeably used

SHINIGAMI [noun] a “death god” or “death spirit” - an entity in Japanese folklore that is responsible for seeing that a person dies at their appointed time and then guiding their spirit to be judged in the afterlife. In this respect, Shinigami are related to the Western concept of the Grim Reaper. Though the Grim Reaper is a single entity, there are multiple shinigami which are often imagined as working together.