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This photograph was executed at Bucharest, in 1869 (Photographed by Carol Szathmari, Bucharest.) At the arrival of spring, it is the custom in Roumania, Servia, and Bulgaria for a group of Gypsy children, quite alone, or under the guidance of a woman or an older girl, themselves only halfclad or actually naked, and having their heads and loins wreathed about with green branches of wild plants, to go from one house to another, before each of which they dance and sing a certain song.

This photograph was executed at Bucharest, in 1869 (Photographed by Carol Szathmari, Bucharest.) At the arrival of spring, it is the custom in Roumania, Servia, and Bulgaria for a group of Gypsy children, quite alone, or under the guidance of a woman or an older girl, themselves only halfclad or actually naked, and having their heads and loins wreathed about with green branches of wild plants, to go from one house to another, before each of which they dance and sing a certain song.

"I do so love my witches and wicked queens. I find myself drawn to feminine archetypes that previous generations have found threatening or dangerous: crones, oracles, madwomen, Amazons, virgins who aren’t helpless, bad mothers. I love to give the vagina dentata voice. It so rarely gets to speak for itself."  — Catherynne M. Valente  (Photo by Matteo Prencipe)

"I do so love my witches and wicked queens. I find myself drawn to feminine archetypes that previous generations have found threatening or dangerous: crones, oracles, madwomen, Amazons, virgins who aren’t helpless, bad mothers. I love to give the vagina dentata voice. It so rarely gets to speak for itself." — Catherynne M. Valente (Photo by Matteo Prencipe)

Afghan Girl by Steve McCurry, 1984. Known only as the Afghan girl — her real identity unknown until she was rediscovered in 2002 — Sharbat Gula’s face became one of the most iconic National Geographic covers of all time, and a symbol of the struggle of refugees everywhere.

Afghan Girl by Steve McCurry, 1984. Known only as the Afghan girl — her real identity unknown until she was rediscovered in 2002 — Sharbat Gula’s face became one of the most iconic National Geographic covers of all time, and a symbol of the struggle of refugees everywhere.

nomadic Romani mama & babes photographed by Mateo Maksimova, 1959

nomadic Romani mama & babes photographed by Mateo Maksimova, 1959

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