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"If you take the Christian Bible and put it out in the wind and the rain, soon the paper on which the words are printed will disintegrate and the words will be gone. Our bible IS the wind."   Statement by an anonymous Native woman.

"If you take the Christian Bible and put it out in the wind and the rain, soon the paper on which the words are printed will disintegrate and the words will be gone. Our bible IS the wind." Statement by an anonymous Native woman.

A Lakota Sioux Prayer...  Aho Mitakuye Oyasin….All my relations. I honour you in this circle of life with me today. I am grateful for this opportunity to acknowledge you in this prayer….  To the Creator, for the ultimate gift of life, I thank you.  To the mineral nation that has built and maintained my bones and all foundations of life experience, I thank you.  To the plant nation that sustains my organs and body and gives me healing herbs for sickness, I thank you.  To the animal...

A Lakota Sioux Prayer... Aho Mitakuye Oyasin….All my relations. I honour you in this circle of life with me today. I am grateful for this opportunity to acknowledge you in this prayer…. To the Creator, for the ultimate gift of life, I thank you. To the mineral nation that has built and maintained my bones and all foundations of life experience, I thank you. To the plant nation that sustains my organs and body and gives me healing herbs for sickness, I thank you. To the animal...

anthony luke's not-just-another-photoblog Blog: Fascinating 19th Century Portraits of Native American Indians ~ By Photographer Frank A. Rinehart

anthony luke's not-just-another-photoblog Blog: Fascinating 19th Century Portraits of Native American Indians ~ By Photographer Frank A. Rinehart

Marie Bottineau Baldwin (1863-1952) was a Chippewa attorney. Marie was the first Native American student and first woman of color to graduate from the Washington College of Law. Today the Women’s Law Association at her alma mater funds a scholarship in her name. Following law school, Marie worked for the Bureau of Indian Affairs and was treasurer the Society of American Indians.

Marie Bottineau Baldwin (1863-1952) was a Chippewa attorney. Marie was the first Native American student and first woman of color to graduate from the Washington College of Law. Today the Women’s Law Association at her alma mater funds a scholarship in her name. Following law school, Marie worked for the Bureau of Indian Affairs and was treasurer the Society of American Indians.