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    • sherese johnson

      An incredible eight bolts struck the Bay Bridge in San Francisco last night which was captured in this incredible shot by photographer Phil McGrew, who took the photo through the rain-soaked window of his apartment. Mr McGrew, 49, was shocked at the striking image which shows the split-second moment of electric forks hitting the span of the bridge

    • Megan Swoboda

      crazy lightning storm last night in the Bay (4/12/12) - someone got this awesome photo of lightning striking the Golden Gate Bridge

    • Badger Maps

      They say that lightning never strikes twice, but this amazing photo proves otherwise. An incredible eight bolts struck the Bay Bridge in San Francisco last night which was captured in this incredible shot by photographer Phil McGrew, who took the photo through the rain-soaked window of his apartment. | From Live& Work in #sanfrancisco, @BadgerMaps

    • Alison B.

      Wild lightning storm in San Francisco Bay Area, Thursday April 12, 2012 --photo by Phil McGrew of multiple lightning bolts hitting the Bay Bridge

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    5 planets will be visible to the naked eye in a couple of days... 1st time in 8 years!

    Oxygen has been detected around Dione, one of Saturn's icy moons. The discovery was made by Cassini, an unmanned Nasa spacecraft, which flew by the moon almost two years ago.

    Galactic collision creates mysterious 'dark core' Images captured by the Hubble telescope reveal a mysterious clump of dark matter thought to be left behind after a massive galactic collision. But this dark matter isn't behaving in the way scientists expect dark matter to behave.

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    Sherrie Chastain shares How to safely watch the transit of Venus on Tuesday Read more: www.foxnews.com/...

    Sherrie Chastain shares How to safely watch the transit of Venus on Tuesday. This will not happen again for a hundred years! Read more: www.foxnews.com/...

    Lucky strike! Eight bolts of lightning hit the iconic Bay Bridge in San Francisco in a spectacular once in a lifetime moment captured by photographer Phil McGrew Read more: www.dailymail.co....

    Many auroras appear green, but sometimes other colors such as red show up—as in this picture taken from the International Space Station on September 26. An aurora's colors depend on which types of atoms cause the splash of light. In most cases, auroral lights appear when charged particles from the solar wind collide with oxygen atoms in Earth's atmosphere, according to a NASA statement.

    Green auroras illuminate the sky over Whitehorse, in Canada's Yukon Territory, on Monday. Such auroral displays are triggered when clouds of charged particles from the sun—known as coronal mass ejections (CMEs)—slam into Earth's magnetic field.

    Green "smoke" curls over houses in Bjarkøy, Norway, in a picture of the northern lights taken February 14. Auroras occur when large numbers of charged particles from the sun encounter Earth's magnetic shield. Most of these particles get corralled toward the Poles, where they slam into atmospheric gases such as nitrogen and oxygen.

    On February 19 night-sky fan and Michigan resident Shawn Malone pulled out a seat to capture this unusual view of the auroral display with stars wheeling across the sky. "Here the northern lights glow over the frozen shore of Lake Superior," he wrote in an email to National Geographic News about his 17-minute-long exposure.

    To better understand how solar storms might interfere with GPS systems, Lessard and his colleagues launched a sounding rocket into the aurora borealis from the University of Alaska's Poker Flat Research Range near Fairbanks on February 18. Sounding rockets are small but powerful suborbital rockets that borrow their name from the marine term "to sound," which means to take measurements.

    Brilliant curtains of light shimmer over Norwegian mountains on February 14—part of a recent spate of auroras that caught sky-watchers by surprise. because the displays weren't linked to specific eruptions from the sun. Space scientists think the light shows arose due not to specific solar eruptions but to common—but no less curious—"cracks" in Earth's magnetic shield.

    Reclining on a snowmobile, a sky-watcher in Karasjok, Norway, basks in the glow of the northern lights on February 20. Especially intense auroras are often linked to solar eruptions called coronal mass ejections, or CMEs, which blast huge clouds of charged particles into space. Sun-watching satellites can see when a CME is aimed at Earth, often giving a day or two of advance warning for incoming solar storms.