Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas

Gardening secrets: plant an egg shell and banana peel with your tomatos for rich soil and healthy plants. Other planting tips here too!

Better Homes and Gardensfrom Better Homes and Gardens

Editors' Picks: Favorite Fuss-Free Plants

Low-maintenance plants: Rose Verbena. Rose verbena is a perennial groundcover loved because it cascades beautifully down hot, dry, sunny slopes and bears an abundance of deep pink flowers. It is rarely out of bloom, but it puts on its strongest show in spring and late summer.

Epsom Salt for Tomato, and Pepper Growing, helps prevent blossom end rot and encourages bigger fruit and healthier plants.

One pinner said: This is how I'm growing my Carrots this year. Learned it by accident last year. The post has a great tutorial.

1tsp epsom salts in 4 c warm water....spray on plant and then 10 days later it produces more fruit due to boost of magnesium... especially for tomatoes, peppers and roses.........green bell pepper plants

frugalliving.about.comfrom frugalliving.about.com

7 Homemade Fertilizer Recipes

6 homemade plant fertilizer "recipes"--very, very simple, cheap, great info.

Organic Weed Killer 4 cups white vinegar 1/4 cup salt 2 teaspoons dish detergent Mix ingredients together in a spray bottle. Spray on weeds.

Lay down a thick layer of CARDBOARD in your raised garden beds to kill the grass. It is perfectly safe to use and will fully decompose, but not before killing any grass below it. They’ll also provide compost and food for worms.

Hometalkfrom Hometalk

How to get rid of gnats in the house!

After doing some research, I have found 5 solutions to getting rid of… :: Hometalk

Newspaper weeds away! Start putting in your plants, work the nutrients in your soil. Wet the newspapers and put them in layers around the plants overlapping as you go. Cover the newspapers with mulch and forget about weeds. Weeds will get through some gardening plastic they will not get through wet newspapers.

Moms Need To Know ™from Moms Need To Know ™

Companion Planting

What not to plant together