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Margaret Hutchinson Rousseau was a chemical engineer who designed the first commercial penicillin production plant. She was also the first female member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

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34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Bertha Parker Pallan Cody (1907–1978) is known as the first female Native American archaeologist.

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34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Margaret Harwood (1885–1979) was an astronomer. She was the very first director of the female-run Maria Mitchell Observatory in Nantucket, Mass., a nonprofit science education institute. | 34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Tererai Trent, PhD, is a Zimbabwean-American woman who was not allowed to go to school as a child because she was female. Tererai was forced to marry at age 11. By age 18, she was the mother of three. "When my husband realized that I wanted to have an education, he would beat me." In 2009, happily remarried Trent earned her doctorate; her thesis looked at HIV/AIDS prevention programs for women and girls in sub-Saharan Africa.

Rachel Carson- "Mother of modern environmentalism"-so ahead of her time. She sounded the alarm despite the predictable backlash form agribusiness and chemical companies who called her a "Hysterical female" and a communist.

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34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Cornelia Clapp (1849–1934) earned both the first and second (from Syracuse and Chicago, respectively) biology doctorate degrees awarded to a woman in the U.S. | 34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

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34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Botanist Matilda Moldenhauer Brooks (b. 1891) attended Harvard and conducted research along with her husband, Sumner Cushing Brooks. She discovered an antidote for carbon monoxide and cyanide poisoning in the ’30s. | 34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Annie Jump Cannon (December 11, 1863 - April 13, 1941) was an American astronomer whose cataloging work was instrumental in the development of contemporary stellar classification. With Edward C. Pickering, she is credited with the creation of the Harvard Classification Scheme, which was the first serious attempt to organize and classify stars based on their temperatures.

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34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Roger Arliner Young (1889–1964) was a zoologist and biologist and the first African-American woman to receive a doctorate in zoology. During her long career she studied radiation, paramecium, and hydration and dehydration of living cells. | 34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

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34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Florence Bascom (1862–1945) was the first woman to earn a Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University and was also the first woman elected to the Geological Society of America. | 34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

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10 Lesser-Known People Who Were The First To Accomplish Things

The first female Secretary of the Air Force, Dr. Sheila E. Widnall.

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34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Mary Knight Dunlap (1910–1992), the founder of the Association for Women Veterinarians. | 34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

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12 Historical Women Who Gave No Fucks

Nellie Bly (1864–1922) Nellie Bly was a daring and influential investigative journalist who wrote groundbreaking stories about political corruption and poverty. She once faked madness in order to report undercover from an abusive mental institution in New York City, which led to outcry and reform. Oh, and she once travelled around the world in a record-breaking 72 days, just ‘cause.

Dr. Clelia Mosher was a brilliant and extraordinary woman who made debunking the claims of Victorian medicine regarding the frailty of the female body her life's work.

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Community Post: 30 Famous Historical Figures When They Were Young

Marie Skłodowska-Curie (11/07/1867 - 7/04/1934), often referred to as Marie Curie or Madame Curie, was a Polish physicist and chemist, working mainly in France, who is famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the only woman to win in two fields, and the only person to win in multiple sciences. She was also the first female professor at the University of Paris (La Sorbonne).

Suffragette, Britain 1900s. Women of Britain the democratic world, never waste your right to vote. These women fought, died and starved for a right we now take for granted. It doesn't matter who you vote for, vote because you can. It's a right still denied to millions of women around the world.

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3,000 men who helped build the Chase Manhattan Bank stand in the window spaces of the building, 1964.