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Margaret Hutchinson Rousseau was a chemical engineer who designed the first commercial penicillin production plant. She was also the first female member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin was an Anglo-American astronomer. She changed the face of astrophysics with her 1925 PhD thesis, in which she demonstrated that the sun was made almost exclusively from hydrogen and helium. Only 2% of its mass came from the other chemical elements, such as iron, oxygen and silicon.

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34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Bertha Parker Pallan Cody (1907–1978) is known as the first female Native American archaeologist.

Rachel Carson- "Mother of modern environmentalism"-so ahead of her time. She sounded the alarm despite the predictable backlash form agribusiness and chemical companies who called her a "Hysterical female" and a communist.

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34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Botanist Matilda Moldenhauer Brooks (b. 1891) attended Harvard and conducted research along with her husband, Sumner Cushing Brooks. She discovered an antidote for carbon monoxide and cyanide poisoning in the ’30s. | 34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Annie Jump Cannon (December 11, 1863 - April 13, 1941) was an American astronomer whose cataloging work was instrumental in the development of contemporary stellar classification. With Edward C. Pickering, she is credited with the creation of the Harvard Classification Scheme, which was the first serious attempt to organize and classify stars based on their temperatures.

Judith Resnick, 2nd American woman in space. Died during the Challenger explosion. From Akron, Ohio.

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34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Roger Arliner Young (1889–1964) was a zoologist and biologist and the first African-American woman to receive a doctorate in zoology. During her long career she studied radiation, paramecium, and hydration and dehydration of living cells. | 34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Kathleen Lonsdale was a crystallographer who established the structure of benzene in 1929, and hexachlorobenzene in 1931. During her career she attained a number of firsts for a female scientist.

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34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Mildred Adams Fenton (1899–1995) trained in paleontology and geology at the University of Iowa. She and her husband, Carroll Lane Fenton, wrote dozens of science books together. | 34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

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34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Dr. Martha Euphemia Lofton Haynes (1890–1980) was the first African-American woman to receive a Ph.D. in math, and she taught math in Washington, D.C., for 47 years. | 34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

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12 Historical Women Who Gave No Fucks

Nellie Bly (1864–1922) Nellie Bly was a daring and influential investigative journalist who wrote groundbreaking stories about political corruption and poverty. She once faked madness in order to report undercover from an abusive mental institution in New York City, which led to outcry and reform. Oh, and she once travelled around the world in a record-breaking 72 days, just ‘cause.

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34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Mary Knight Dunlap (1910–1992), the founder of the Association for Women Veterinarians. | 34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Dr. Clelia Mosher was a brilliant and extraordinary woman who made debunking the claims of Victorian medicine regarding the frailty of the female body her life's work.

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34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

Florence Bascom (1862–1945) was the first woman to earn a Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University and was also the first woman elected to the Geological Society of America. | 34 American Lady Scientists Who Changed The World

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Community Post: 30 Famous Historical Figures When They Were Young

Marie Skłodowska-Curie (11/07/1867 - 7/04/1934), often referred to as Marie Curie or Madame Curie, was a Polish physicist and chemist, working mainly in France, who is famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the only woman to win in two fields, and the only person to win in multiple sciences. She was also the first female professor at the University of Paris (La Sorbonne).

Suffragette, Britain 1900s. Women of Britain the democratic world, never waste your right to vote. These women fought, died and starved for a right we now take for granted. It doesn't matter who you vote for, vote because you can. It's a right still denied to millions of women around the world.

Lise Meitner -- In collaboration with Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassman, became first to recognize uranium atom actually split when bombarded by neutrons. (Chemical Heritage Foundation)