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urtles are well known for their longevity and protective shells, but it turns out these reptiles use sound to stick together and care for young, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society and other organizations. Scientists working in the Brazilian Amazon have found that Giant South American river turtles actually use several different kinds of vocal communication to coordinate their social behaviors, including one used by female turtles to call to their newly hatched offspring

A pair of Great Crested Grebe chicks ride out on their fathers back on their fist morning after hatching. Mist is rising from the water in the background, and a stone fly hatch occurred at first light; the surface of the lake,reflecting the green of the forest surrounding it, is littered with the insects trying to free themselves from the grip of surface tension - which provides an abundance of food for the parent grebe to feed his young offspring.

MALE BETTAS TAKE CHARGE OF CARING FOR THEIR OFFSPRING Uncommon in the animal kingdom but certainly not unheard of, betta fathers nest and care for their offspring while the mothers don't participate. Once a female betta lays her eggs, her mate chases her away and corrals the eggs into his bubble nest, where he tends to them until they hatch.

Scientists working in the Brazilian Amazon have found that Giant South American river turtles actually use several different kinds of vocal communication to coordinate their social behaviors, including one used by female turtles to call to their newly hatched offspring in what is the first instance of recorded parental care in turtles.