Human tongue surface, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). Covering the tongue's surface are scale-like projections called filiform papillae, which sense pressure. The round areas (purple) are fungiform papillae which contain the taste buds.

Human tongue surface, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). Covering the tongue's surface are scale-like projections called filiform papillae, which sense pressure. The round areas (purple) are fungiform papillae which contain the taste buds.

Muscle fibre, SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). I changed my mind, I want to be a scientist and study EVERYTHING!

Muscle fibre, SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). I changed my mind, I want to be a scientist and study EVERYTHING!

Inner ear hair cells, Scanning Electron Microscope. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of sensory hair cells from the inner ear. These cells are surrounded by a fluid called endolymph. As sound enters the ear it causes waves to form in the endolymph, which in turn cause the hairs to move. The movement is converted to an electrical signal that is passed on to the brain. Each crescent-shaped arrangement of hairs lies atop a single cell.

Inner ear hair cells, Scanning Electron Microscope. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of sensory hair cells from the inner ear. These cells are surrounded by a fluid called endolymph. As sound enters the ear it causes waves to form in the endolymph, which in turn cause the hairs to move. The movement is converted to an electrical signal that is passed on to the brain. Each crescent-shaped arrangement of hairs lies atop a single cell.

Red and white blood cells inside a small blood vessel are captured by a colored scanning electron microscope.  Photograph by Steve Gschmeissner.

Red and white blood cells inside a small blood vessel are captured by a colored scanning electron microscope. Photograph by Steve Gschmeissner.

Credit: David Gregory and Debbie Marshall, Wellcome Images. Colour-enhanced scanning electron micrograph of a blood clot, with squamous tissue visible beneath. As a blood clot on a surface injury dries out it forms a protective scab over the wound allowing new skin to grow underneath.  Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons by-nc-nd 2.0 UK.

Credit: David Gregory and Debbie Marshall, Wellcome Images. Colour-enhanced scanning electron micrograph of a blood clot, with squamous tissue visible beneath. As a blood clot on a surface injury dries out it forms a protective scab over the wound allowing new skin to grow underneath. Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons by-nc-nd 2.0 UK.

Macrophage (red) engulfing tuberculosis bacteria (yellow), taken with ZEISS FE-SEM. Courtesy of Dr. Volker Brinkmann, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin/ Germany.

Macrophage (red) engulfing tuberculosis bacteria (yellow), taken with ZEISS FE-SEM. Courtesy of Dr. Volker Brinkmann, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin/ Germany.

A freeze fracture scanning electron micrograph of a single cell.  The cell nucleus is orange.  The small black holes are nuclear pores.  The cell membranes are purple, the endoplasmic reticulum is pink, and the golgi apparatus is green.    Image credit; Lennart Nilsson

A freeze fracture scanning electron micrograph of a single cell. The cell nucleus is orange. The small black holes are nuclear pores. The cell membranes are purple, the endoplasmic reticulum is pink, and the golgi apparatus is green. Image credit; Lennart Nilsson

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