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    Antique Persian char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The armor plates can be rectangular or round, and the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th century, chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

    Persian mail and plate armor for horse and cavalry soldier, dating from 1450, this type of armor became the standard type of equipment for the heavy cavalry under the Timurids (1370-1506), the Mongol successor empire which ruled from Samarkand, and under the Ottoman Turks. These cavalry, armed with bow, sword and sometimes lance, were the main component of all medieval Islamic armies. the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art.

    Parade armour of Henry II of France, c1555. Steel, silvered, gilt. Ht. overall 74 inches (187.96 cm), Wt. 53¼ lbs. (24.20 kg). he decoration includes, at the center of the breast, a Roman warrior receiving tribute of arms from two kneeling females and, on the shoulders, Apollo chasing the nymph Daphne (front) and Apollo with the slain monster Python (back). The crescent moon, one of the badges of Henry II (r. 1547–59), is found in several places.

    Getting back into armor! As in legit armor! Wow, this board almost went to total LARP...

    Persian Qajar dynasty char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), 19th century, plate body armor worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. Acid etched with calligraphy and figures of animals and humans surrounded by arabesque designs. The two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. Chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran in the 16th century.

    Saint George and the Dragon, ca. 1420. Attributed to Hans von Judenburg, Austrian. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The Cloisters Collection

    The Arabic inscriptions include the names of the maker and the owner, the latter apparently a descendant of the ruling house of the Crimean Tartars.

    Linen smock with silk and metal thread embroidery. And awesome closeup of the gusset layout.

    Qajar Khula Khud (Helmet) & Sipar (Shield) (19th Century CE Armor, Persia) (Czerny's International Auction House)

    Knight's Armor Italy (likely Milan) ca. 1565

    Indo-Persian chamfron (armor for a horses head), 19th Century, blued iron, with a cusp and three arched mounts, the border decorated by a gilt plaque engraved with floral motifs, at the upper part two gold-inlaid engravings depicting cobras; with ear covers, complete with inside stuffing, 68 cm.

    Persian char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh). Literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The armor plates can be rectangular or round, and the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th century, chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran, front and pack panels.

    Persian char-aina cuirass, detail view, 17th century,(chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh). Literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. Rectangular or round plates, the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th c, char-aina were introduced in Persia, steel; inlaid with gold, H. 14.50 in. (36.8 cm) Diam. 13 in. (33 cm), Met Museum.

    Indo-Persian char-aina cuirass, (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), 18th c, literally the four mirrors, worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India, Central Asia. The plates can be rectangular or round, breast and back plates are larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th c, char-aina were introduced in Persia, steel, copper, textile (velvet), H. 15 1/2 in. (39.4 cm); L. 35 1/2 in. (90.2 cm), Met Museum. (supposedly Indian but it looks Persian).

    Indo-Persian char-aina cuirass, (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), detail view, 18th c, literally the four mirrors, worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India, Central Asia. Rectangular or round plates, breast and back plates are larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th c, char-aina were introduced in Persia, steel, copper, textile (velvet), H. 15 1/2 in. (39.4 cm); L. 35 1/2 in. (90.2 cm), Met Museum. (supposedly Indian but it looks Persian).

    Indo-Persian char-aina cuirass, (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), detail view, 18th c, literally the four mirrors, worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India, Central Asia. Rectangular or round plates, breast and back plates are larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th c, char-aina were introduced in Persia, steel, copper, textile (velvet), H. 15 1/2 in. (39.4 cm); L. 35 1/2 in. (90.2 cm), Met Museum. (supposedly Indian but it looks Persian).

    Indo-Persian char-aina cuirass, (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), detail view, 18th c, literally the four mirrors, worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India, Central Asia. Rectangular or round plates, breast and back plates are larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th c, char-aina were introduced in Persia, steel, copper, textile (velvet), H. 15 1/2 in. (39.4 cm); L. 35 1/2 in. (90.2 cm), Met Museum. (supposedly Indian but it looks Persian).

    Indo-Persian char-aina cuirass, (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), detail view, 18th c, literally the four mirrors, worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India, Central Asia. Rectangular or round plates, breast and back plates are larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th c, char-aina were introduced in Persia, steel, copper, textile (velvet), H. 15 1/2 in. (39.4 cm); L. 35 1/2 in. (90.2 cm), Met Museum. (supposedly Indian but it looks Persian).

    Persian char-aina cuirass, 17th century,(chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh). Literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The armor plates can be rectangular or round, and the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th c, char-aina were introduced in Persia, steel; inlaid with gold, H. 14.50 in. (36.8 cm) Diam. 13 in. (33 cm), Met Museum.

    Indian dastana/bazu band (arm guards) and char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh). Literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The armor plates can be rectangular or round, and the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th century, chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran.