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Antique Persian char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The armor plates can be rectangular or round, and the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th century, chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Antique Persian char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh). Literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The armor plates can be rectangular or round, and the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th century, chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Armor of the Ottoman Empire. A complete suit of 16th century armor as worn by fully armored cavalryman (sipahi) including Chichak (helmet), krug (chest armor), zirah (mail shirt), kolluk/bazu band (vambrace/arm guards), dizcek (cuisse or knee and thigh armor), and kolçak (greaves or shin armor). Stibbert Museum, Florence Italy.

Persian mail and plate armor for horse and cavalry soldier, dating from 1450, this type of armor became the standard type of equipment for the heavy cavalry under the Timurids (1370-1506), the Mongol successor empire which ruled from Samarkand, and under the Ottoman Turks. These cavalry, armed with bow, sword and sometimes lance, were the main component of all medieval Islamic armies. the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Indian dastana/bazu band (arm guards) and char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh). Literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The armor plates can be rectangular or round, and the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th century, chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran.

Ottoman Empire mail and plate kolçak (greaves or shin armor) as worn by fully armored cavalryman (sipahi) in conjunction with migfer (helmet), dizcek (cuisse or knee and thigh armor), zirah (mail shirt), kolluk/bazu band (vambrace/arm guards), and krug (chest armor). Museums often confuse kolçak (greaves) for kolluk/bazu band (vambrace/arm guards), even in Turkish museums they are labeled as arm guards and mounted on the arms of display mannequins rather than on the lower leg.

Chichak (End of 17th Century CE Ottoman Armor) | Steel, copper, leather, velvet and silk

Indian chilta hazar masha (coat of a thousand nails), armored clothing made from layers of fabric faced with velvet and studded with numerous small brass nails, which were often gilded, and Ottoman style chichak helmet which was originally worn by cavalry of the Ottoman Empire, dastana (arm guards) and katar (push dagger). Fabric armor was very popular in India because metal became very hot under the Indian sun. This example has additional armor plates in the chest, arm and thigh areas.

Ottoman Empire mail-and-plate dizcek (cuisse or knee and thigh armor) as worn by fully armored cavalryman (sipahi) in conjunction with migfer (helmet), krug (chest armor), zirah (mail shirt), kolluk/bazu band (vambrace/arm guards), and kolçak (greaves or shin armor). Les Invalides Museum of Arms and Armor, Paris France.

Indian 18th century char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh)‎. Plate body armor worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. Chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran in the 16th century. Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, Ma.

Persian khula-khud (helmet), char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), literally the four mirrors, chest armor with four plates, bazu band (vambrace/arm guards).

The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Pair of Gauntlets Belonging to the Armor of Duke Friedrich Ulrich of Brunswick (1591–1634)

Field armor of Henry VIII of England about 1544...so about three years before his death. Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Henry_VIII_armor_by_Matthew_Bisanz.JPG at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC, USA.

Indian armor, khula-khud (helmet), char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), literally the four mirrors, chest armor with four plates, dastanas/bazu band (vambrace/arm guards), zirah (mail shirt) and zirah pajama (mail trousers).

Antique Persian char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh). Literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The armor plates can be rectangular or round, and the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th century, chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran.

Ottoman Empire armor belonging to Sultan Mustafa III consisting of migfer (helmet), zirah (mail shirt), mail trousers, kolluk/bazu band (vambrace/arm guards), shamshir (sabre), decorated with gold and encrusted with jewels, 18th century, exhibited in the Imperial Treasury of Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey

Persian char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh)‎, composite, watered steel, comprising four rectangular plates, those at the sides with arched recesses for the arms, three etched with calligraphic panels at the borders and a central foliate cartouche, all enriched with gold koftgari, fitted with reinforced brass borders, and buckles for closure and suspension, and the remaining panel engraved 29 cm; 11 1/2 in high Inscribed with verses in Persian and Arabic, 19th century.

Ottoman Empire mail and plate kolçak (greaves or shin armor) as worn by fully armored cavalryman (sipahi) in conjunction with migfer (helmet), dizcek (cuisse or knee and thigh armor), zirah (mail shirt), kolluk/bazu band (vambrace/arm guards), and krug (chest armor). Museums often confuse kolçak (greaves) for kolluk/bazu band (vambrace/arm guards), even in Turkish museums they are labeled as arm guards and mounted on the arms of display mannequins rather than on the lower leg.

Armour of the Ottoman Empire. 16th to 17th century krug (cuirass/chest armor) with Saint-Irene Arsenal mark, complete with cotton fringes, worn by fully armored cavalryman in conjunction with migfer (helmet), dizcek (cuisse or knee and thigh armor), zirah (mail shirt), kolluk/bazu band (vambrace/arm guards), and kolçak (greaves or shin armor).

Ottoman kolçak (greaves) and dizcek (cuisse or knee and thigh armor), 16th century, as worn by fully armored cavalryman (sipahi).

Turkey, 16th Century. Ottoman Empire. Steel with gilt studs, engraved and open work design.