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  • Worldantiques Antiques

    Antique Persian char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The armor plates can be rectangular or round, and the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th century, chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

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Armour of the Ottoman Empire. 16th to 17th century krug (cuirass/chest armor) with Saint-Irene Arsenal mark, complete with cotton fringes, worn by fully armored cavalryman in conjunction with migfer (helmet), dizcek (cuisse or knee and thigh armor), zirah (mail shirt), kolluk/bazu band (vambrace/arm guards), and kolçak (greaves or shin armor).

Armor of the Ottoman Empire. A complete suit of 16th century armor as worn by fully armored cavalryman (sipahi) including Chichak (helmet), krug (chest armor), zirah (mail shirt), kolluk/bazu band (vambrace/arm guards), dizcek (cuisse or knee and thigh armor), and kolçak (greaves or shin armor). Stibbert Museum, Florence Italy.

Ottoman Empire calligraphic ornament on mail and plate kolçak aka greaves or shin armor worn by fully armored cavalrymen or sipahi. Museums often confuse kolçak (greaves) for kolluk/bazu band or arm guards.

16th century engraved breastplate from a man-at-arms' harness by Arutemu, via Flickr