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Antique Persian char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The armor plates can be rectangular or round, and the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th century, chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Sword and Scabbard, ca. 60 B.C. Celtic. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Rogers Fund, 1999 (1999.94a-d).

Steel, embossed, with traces of gilding French end of 16th century The decoration, originally gilt overall, consists of battle scenes of soldiers wearing classical armor. Now incomplete, the armor once possessed a get (collar) and arm defenses.

Persian char-aina cuirass, (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), detail view, 18th c, literally the four mirrors, worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India, Central Asia. Rectangular or round plates, breast and back plates are larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th c, char-aina were introduced in Persia, steel, copper, textile (velvet), H. 15 1/2 in. (39.4 cm); L. 35 1/2 in. (90.2 cm), Met Museum.

Persian char-aina cuirass, (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), detail view, 18th c, literally the four mirrors, worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India, Central Asia. Rectangular or round plates, breast and back plates are larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th c, char-aina were introduced in Persia, steel, copper, textile (velvet), H. 15 1/2 in. (39.4 cm); L. 35 1/2 in. (90.2 cm), Met Museum.

Persian char-aina cuirass, (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh), 18th c, literally the four mirrors, worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India, Central Asia. The plates can be rectangular or round, breast and back plates are larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th c, char-aina were introduced in Persia, steel, copper, textile (velvet), H. 15 1/2 in. (39.4 cm); L. 35 1/2 in. (90.2 cm), Met Museum.

Persian char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh). Literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia, the interior is lined with velvet, It features elegant arabesques inlaid in gold, with leaves, clusters and birds and framed by a wide frieze of daisies and roses. Musée de l'Armée.

Indo-Persian char-aina cuirass, late 18th to 19th century, steel, gold, H. 15 1/2 in. (39.37 cm); Wt. 6 lb. 13, Met Museum. The Arabic inscriptions stress God as the God of Light, the rewards He will give His servants, and His punishment of unbelievers and evildoers. The light imagery is particulary appropriate for gold embellished armors of "four mirror" (char aina) type. (the museum says "probably Indian", but it looks Persian to me.)

Persian char-aina cuirass, detail view, 17th century,(chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh). Literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. Rectangular or round plates, the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th c, char-aina were introduced in Persia, steel; inlaid with gold, H. 14.50 in. (36.8 cm) Diam. 13 in. (33 cm), Met Museum.

Ottoman or Persian turban helmet, 15th to 16th century, steel with silver inlay, A warrior would have worn this helmet over a cloth turban. He would have been confident of being safeguarded in battle by the writing around the helmet's rim. The inscription from the Qur'an is garbled however, indicating that its Iranian maker may not have known Arabic, but it was enough to invoke the protective power of God's word. Walters Art Museum, Baltimore Maryland. 38.5 × 23.4 cm (15.2 × 9.2 in) (h. x…