Susie King Taylor: first African American army nurse; the  only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences; also the first African American to teach openly in a school for former slaves in Georgia.

Susie King Taylor: first African American army nurse; the only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences; also the first African American to teach openly in a school for former slaves in Georgia.

Fredi Washington refused to "pass" for white, at Hollywood's suggestion, and was therefore typecast as mixed race and never allowed a flourishing career. Her stance, however, made her an advocate among African Americans.

Fredi Washington refused to "pass" for white, at Hollywood's suggestion, and was therefore typecast as mixed race and never allowed a flourishing career. Her stance, however, made her an advocate among African Americans.

Jane M. Bolin was the 1st African American woman graduate of Yale Law School & the first black FEMALE judge in the United States. She's pictured here in July 1939 after her appointment by NYC Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia. Judge Bolin retired in 1979after 40 yrs on the Bench (only because she reached the mandatory age). She passed away in 2007 at age 98.

Jane M. Bolin was the 1st African American woman graduate of Yale Law School & the first black FEMALE judge in the United States. She's pictured here in July 1939 after her appointment by NYC Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia. Judge Bolin retired in 1979after 40 yrs on the Bench (only because she reached the mandatory age). She passed away in 2007 at age 98.

Đòi quyền bình đẳng cho phụ nữ cũng là một sự kiến lớn trong thập kỷ này. Nó giúp người phụ nữ đấu tranh cho mình, sự kiện này cũng gây ảnh hưởng lớn cho thời trang lúc bấy giờ

Đòi quyền bình đẳng cho phụ nữ cũng là một sự kiến lớn trong thập kỷ này. Nó giúp người phụ nữ đấu tranh cho mình, sự kiện này cũng gây ảnh hưởng lớn cho thời trang lúc bấy giờ

Mary Eliza Mahoney (May 7, 1845 – January 4, 1926) was the first African American to study and work as a professionally trained nurse in the United States, graduating in 1879. Mahoney was one of the first African Americans to graduate from a nursing school, and she prospered in a predominantly white society. She also challenged discrimination against African Americans in nursing.

Mary Eliza Mahoney (May 7, 1845 – January 4, 1926) was the first African American to study and work as a professionally trained nurse in the United States, graduating in 1879. Mahoney was one of the first African Americans to graduate from a nursing school, and she prospered in a predominantly white society. She also challenged discrimination against African Americans in nursing.

Halle Tanner Dillon Johnson became the first woman to earn a license to practice medicine in Alabama.

Halle Tanner Dillon Johnson became the first woman to earn a license to practice medicine in Alabama.

Anne Boleyn facial reconstruction, THIS is so very fascinating. It is amazing to be able to put a face to such an infamous person in History.

Anne Boleyn facial reconstruction, THIS is so very fascinating. It is amazing to be able to put a face to such an infamous person in History.

For almost 70 years, Lucy Parsons fought for the rights of the poor and disenfranchised in the face of an increasingly oppressive industrial economic system. Her radical activism challenged the racist and sexist sentiment in a time when it was assumed that women were biologically determined to stay at home barefoot and pregnant.   The Chicago police labeled her “more dangerous than a thousand rioters.”  #AmericanGovernment

For almost 70 years, Lucy Parsons fought for the rights of the poor and disenfranchised in the face of an increasingly oppressive industrial economic system. Her radical activism challenged the racist and sexist sentiment in a time when it was assumed that women were biologically determined to stay at home barefoot and pregnant. The Chicago police labeled her “more dangerous than a thousand rioters.” #AmericanGovernment

Phillis Wheatley (ca. 1753-1784), an eighteenth-century African-American woman who was a slave and a poet, was the first black American to be published. She is also credited with originating the genres of African-American poetry and African-American women’s literature. Due to the fact tha no one in America was willing to print her works, her first writings were actually published in London, England.

Phillis Wheatley (ca. 1753-1784), an eighteenth-century African-American woman who was a slave and a poet, was the first black American to be published. She is also credited with originating the genres of African-American poetry and African-American women’s literature. Due to the fact tha no one in America was willing to print her works, her first writings were actually published in London, England.

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