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    Running through downtown San Diego, the Martin Luther King Promenade is a vibrant, palm-lined ribbon that parallels an active trolley line along Harbor Drive. The trail provides direct access to many of the city's highlights, and its rich supply of public art, grassy areas, water fountains and people-watching opportunities makes the promenade a San Diego highlight in itself. The "Breaking of the Chains" sculpture by Melvin Edwards gives striking testament to the hard fought path to civil rights. As you approach the monument, you can read many of Dr. King’s most poignant writings emblazened in footstones, then see the over-sized polished metal sculpture which symbolizes breaking the chains of bigotry and discrimination in America; this must-visit attraction is across the street from San Diego Convention Center. The plaque at the foot of the sculpture bears a quote by Dr. Martin Luther King: "Along the way of life, someone must have sense enough and morality enough to cut off the chain of hate. This can only be done by projecting the ethic of love to the center of our lives."

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America's Finest Timelapse by XOXO Wedding Studio. Footage of San Diego. Amazing and beautiful timelapse video of San Diego

Running through downtown San Diego, the Martin Luther King Promenade is a vibrant, palm-lined ribbon that parallels an active trolley line along Harbor Drive. The trail provides direct access to many of the city's highlights, and its rich supply of public art, grassy areas, water fountains and people-watching opportunities makes the promenade a San Diego highlight in itself. The "Breaking of the Chains" sculpture by Melvin Edwards gives striking testament to the hard fought path to civil rights. As you approach the monument, you can read many of Dr. King’s most poignant writings emblazened in footstones, then see the over-sized polished metal sculpture which symbolizes breaking the chains of bigotry and discrimination in America; this must-visit attraction is across the street from San Diego Convention Center. The plaque at the foot of the sculpture bears a quote by Dr. Martin Luther King: "Along the way of life, someone must have sense enough and morality enough to cut off the chain of hate. This can only be done by projecting the ethic of love to the center of our lives."

The Gaslamp Quarter is the historic heart of San Diego, California. It is a 16½ block historical neighborhood in Downtown San Diego and is the center of downtown night life. The Quarter is home to many events and festivals, including Mardi Gras in the Gaslamp, Street Scene Music Festival, Taste of Gaslamp and ShamROCK, a St. Patrick's Day event. PETCO Park, home of the San Diego Padres is located one block away in downtown San Diego's East Village. The area is listed as a historic district on the National Register of Historic Places as Gaslamp Quarter Historic District. Its main period of development began in 1867, when Alonzo Horton bought the land in hopes of creating a new city center closer to the bay, and chose 5th Avenue as its main street. After a period of urban decay, the neighborhood underwent urban renewal in the 1980s and 1990s, and is today an energetic business and entertainment district. The Gaslamp Quarter extends from Broadway to Harbor Drive, and from 4th to 6th Avenue, covering 16½ blocks. It includes 94 historic buildings, most of which were constructed in the Victorian Era, and are still in use with active tenants including restaurants, shops and nightclubs.

The Old Globe Theatre was built in 1935 for the presentation of abridged versions of Shakespeare's plays as part of the California Pacific International Exposition. At the conclusion of the exposition in 1937, a non-profit producing corporation, the San Diego Community Theatre, leased the theater and adjacent buildings from the City of San Diego (an arrangement that continues today) and renovated the theater for ongoing use. On March 8, 1978, an arson fire destroyed the landmark Old Globe Theatre. Fortunately, the administrative offices, rehearsal hall, dressing rooms, scenery and costume shops, and the Cassius Carter Centre Stage were spared from the flames. While plans to rebuild the Globe were put into action, the immediate need for a space to produce that summer's San Diego National Shakespeare Festival resulted in the construction of the Festival Stage, an award-winning outdoor theater. When the Festival Stage was destroyed by another arson fire in 1984, the new 612-seat Lowell Davies Festival Theatre was constructed in 1985. The Old Globe has been home to the most acclaimed national artists, designers, directors and playwrights in the Theatre industry. More than twenty productions produced at The Old Globe have gone on to play on Broadway and off-Broadway. The Old Globe annually produces 15 mainstage productions from all periods and styles, ranging from Shakespeare to an ongoing emphasis on the development and production of new works. With a current operating budget of approximately $20 million, the Globe is one of San Diego's largest arts institutions, its leading arts employer, and among the nation's top-ranked regional theatres. More than 250,000 people annually attend Globe productions and participate in the theater's education programs and outreach services.

Embarcadero Marina Park is right next door to Seaport Village, and is a short stroll from the San Diego Convention Center, the downtown Hyatt (which has incredible views from its top floor lounge) and Marriott hotels, the Gaslamp Quarter and Petco Park. Embarcadero Marina Park takes the form of two green "arms" that reach into the San Diego Bay and wrap around the Embarcadero Marina. The entrance to the marina divides the parks. A walkway extends along the shore, around the marina and past the Marriott and San Diego Convention Center, connecting the two small parks. You can walk right out of Seaport Village into the Embarcadero Park North. Very popular and sometimes crowded on weekends, picnicing, kite flying and enjoying the spectacular views are popular activities. Embarcadero Marina Park South has been home to the Symphony Summer Pops (with a name change in 2010 to the Bridgeport Education Summer Pops) and the festival of restaurants, "San Diego a la Carte". The South Embarcadero Park Pier (also known as the Embarcadero Marina Pier) has been a popular fishing pier since its dedication in 1980.

Seaport Village is a shopping and dining complex adjacent to San Diego Bay in downtown San Diego, California. It houses more than 70 shops, galleries, and eateries on 90,000 square feet of waterfront property. The Village contains several freestanding buildings in an assortment of architectural styles, from Victorian to traditional Mexican. It is designed to be a car-free environment, with four miles of winding paths rather than streets connecting the various buildings. It is located in walking distance from the San Diego Convention Center and the cruise ship terminal. Seaport Village was built on landfill over Punta de los Muertos (Spanish for Point of the Dead), where the Spanish expedition of 1782 buried those who had died of scurvy. In later years it was a railroad yard where goods and other materials used to come through the area. Then Seaport Village broke ground in 1978 and opened in 1980.

Explore a floating city at sea and relive nearly 50 years of world history aboard the USS Midway, the longest-serving Navy aircraft carrier of the 20th century. Museum admission includes a self-guided audio tour to 60 exhibits throughout the historic aircraft carrier and 25 restored aircraft. Exhibits range from the crew's sleeping quarters to a massive galley, engine room, the ship's jail, officer's country, post office, machine shops, and pilots' ready rooms, as well as primary flight control and the bridge high in the island over the flight deck. Especially popular are the museum docents you'll meet throughout the ship. Each is eager to share a personal story, an anecdote, or amazing statistic, adding to your amazement throughout your adventure. (Most visitors spend 3-4 hours aboard Midway!) Family-oriented activities for all ages abound: three types of flight simulators, music videos, short films, climb-aboard aircraft and cockpits, interactive exhibits, "Ejection Seat Theater," and much more.

Coronado, also known as Coronado Island, is an affluent resort city located in San Diego County, California, 5.2 miles from downtown San Diego. U.S. News and World Report lists Coronado as one of the most expensive places to reside in the United States. Coronado lies on a peninsula connected to the mainland by a 10-mile isthmus called the Silver Strand (locally, The Strand.) Locals sometimes call Coronado 'The Island' or 'Coronado Island', and they denote the core living and business area as 'The Village'. In May 2012, Dr. Stephen Leatherman, Director of the Laboratory for Coastal Research, ranked Coronado Beach as the best beach in the United States. Coronado is Spanish for "the crowned one", and thus it is nicknamed The Crown City. There have been three ships of the United States Navy named after the city, including the USS Coronado (LCS-4). The Hotel del Coronado (also known as 'The De'l and 'Hotel del') is a beachfront luxury hotel in the city of Coronado. It is one of the few surviving examples of an American architectural genre: the wooden Victorian beach resort. It is one of the oldest and largest all-wooden buildings in California and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1977, and is a designated California Historical Landmark. When it opened in 1888, it was the largest resort hotel in the world. It has hosted presidents, royalty, and celebrities through the years. The hotel has been featured in numerous books and movies, including 'Some Like It Hot', starring Jack Lemmon, Tony Curtis and Marilyn Monroe.

The Embarcadero in San Diego, California, USA is the area along the San Diego harbor on the east side of San Diego Bay. "Embarcadero" is a Spanish word meaning "landing place". The Embarcadero sits on property administered by the Port of San Diego, in the Columbia district of Downtown San Diego. The Embarcadero is home to the San Diego cruise ship terminal, the USS Midway museum ship at Navy Pier, the Star of India and seven other historic vessels belonging to the San Diego Maritime Museum, and various restaurants and shops from the North Embarcadero down through Seaport Village. The Port is redeveloping the historic Broadway Pier to create a second cruise-ship pier and terminal. That project is slated for completion in December 2010.

Balboa Park is a 1,200-acre urban cultural park in San Diego, California. The park is named after the Spanish maritime explorer Vasco Núñez de Balboa. It was the location of the 1915 Panama–California Exposition and 1935 California Pacific International Exposition which each created architectural landmarks for the park. The park's site was placed in reserve in 1835, and so is one of the oldest sites in the United States dedicated to public recreational use. In addition to open space areas, natural vegetation green belts, gardens and walking paths, it contains a variety of cultural attractions including many museums, several theaters, and the world famous San Diego Zoo. There are also many recreational facilities and several gift shops and restaurants. Balboa Park, and the historic Exposition buildings, were declared a National Historic Landmark and National Historic Landmark District in 1977, and placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Harbor Island is a man-made peninsula created in 1961 from harbor dredgings and is located in San Diego Bay, San Diego, California. The island lies between Shelter Island and Downtown San Diego, directly across Harbor Drive from San Diego Airport. It is 2 miles (3.2 km) long and only a few hundred feet wide. A single road, Harbor Island Drive, runs from one end of Harbor Island to the other and connects it to the mainland. The "island" includes several marinas which harbor thousands of small sailboats, as well as several restaurants, two high-rise hotels, and Harbor Island Drive Park. It is under the control of the Port of San Diego.

Across from the western end of Harbor Island, on the mainland's Spanish Landing Park, a bronze plaque marks the arrival in 1769 of a party from Spain that headed north from San Diego to conquer California. The plaque states "Near this point, sea and land parties of the Portola-Serra Expedition met. Two ships, the San Antonio and the San Carlos, anchored on May 4-5, 1769. The scurvy-weakened survivors of the voyage established a camp, where on May 14 and July 1 they greeted the overland parties from Baja California. Together, they began the Spanish occupation of Alta California." As part of a beautification program, the city has begun installing whimsical, if sometimes monumental, artworks in this park, which is less visited than many city parks, and therefore a quiet enclave in which to spend a peaceful hour or two.

The Japanese Friendship Bell on Shelter Island in San Diego was presented by the City of Yokohama to the people of San Diego in 1958 as a symbol of eternal friendship. This magnificent bell was cast by the artist Masahiko Katori, who has been designated as a living National Treasure by the Government of Japan. The San Diego-Yokohama Sister City Society was established in 1957 and was the first Sister City organization on the West Coast. Its objective is to promote mutual understanding, respect and friendship through cultural, economic and other exchanges on People to People and City to City relationships.

La Jolla is an affluent, hilly seaside resort community, occupying 7 miles of curving coastline along the Pacific Ocean in Southern California within the northern city limits of San Diego. Local Native Americans, the Kumeyaay, called this location mat kulaaxuuy, 'land of holes'. What sort of topographic feature the description "holes" refers to is uncertain, but it may be the sea-level caves on the north facing bluffs which are visible from La Jolla Shores. This was apparently corrupted by the Spanish occupiers to "La Jolla". An alternate suggested origin is that the name is a corruption of the Spanish La Joya, meaning "the jewel". Although disputed by scholars, this origin of the name has been widely cited in popular culture. La Jolla is an area of mixed geology, including sandy beaches and rocky shorelines. The most compelling geographical highlight of La Jolla is its ocean front, with alternating rugged and sandy coast line and wild seal congregations.

San Diego Zoo Safari Park. The Safari Park is an expansive wildlife sanctuary that is home to more than 2,600 animals representing more than 300 species. Its renowned botanical collection represents 3,500 species and 1.5 million specimens. Over half of the Park’s 1,800 acres (730 hectares) have been set aside as protected native species habitat. It is located 30 miles (48 kilometers) north of downtown San Diego in the San Pasqual Valley near Escondido, California.

Old Town San Diego State Historic Park presents the opportunity to experience the history of early San Diego by providing a connection to the past. Learn about life in the Mexican and early American periods of 1821 to 1872. Even today, life moves more slowly in this part of San Diego, where the hustle and bustle is balanced with history and fiestas. Visitors are offered a glimpse into yesteryear, as converging cultures transformed San Diego from a Mexican pueblo to an American settlement. The core of restored original historic buildings from the interpretive period are complemented by reconstructed sites, along with early twentieth century buildings designed in the same mode. The Historic Plaza remains a gathering place for community events and historic activity. Five original adobe buildings are part of the historic park, which includes museums, unique retail shops, and several restaurants.

Located in Point Loma, a neighborhood of San Diego, California, Naval Base Point Loma (NBPL) was established on 1 October 1998 when Navy facilities in the Point Loma area of San Diego were consolidated under Commander, Navy Region Southwest. Naval Base Point Loma consists of seven facilities: Submarine Base, Fleet Antisubmarine Warfare Training Center, Fleet Combat Training Center Pacific, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR), SPAWAR Systems Center, the Fleet Intelligence Command Pacific and Naval Consolidated Brig, Miramar. These close-knit commands form a diverse and highly technical hub of naval activity. The on base population is around 22,000 Navy and civilian personnel.

Point Loma Tidepools, San Diego. On the western side of Point Loma lies the rocky intertidal zone, a window into the ocean ecosystem that lies along of San Diego's coast. During periods of low tide, pools form along this shore in rocky depressions. In them you may see flowery anemones, elusive octopi, spongy deadman's fingers, and a myriad of other creatures. The tidepools are a wonderful discovery zone, but be careful if you visit. The intertidal area is a very sensitive ecosystem. Few animals in this ecosystem can harm humans, but many animals are sensitive, and can even be killed, when handled or just touched by humans. Ask a ranger or volunteer how you can best explore the tidepools without harming them.

Old Point Loma Lighthouse, San Diego. The Old Point Loma Lighthouse stood watch over the entrance to San Diego Bay for 36 years. At dusk on November 15, 1855, the light keeper climbed the winding stairs and lit the light for the first time. What seemed to be a good location 422 feet above sea level, however, had a serious flaw. Fog and low clouds often obscured the light. On March 23, 1891, the light was extinguished and the keeper moved to a new lighthouse location closer to the water at the tip of the Point. Today, the Old Point Loma Lighthouse still stands watch over San Diego, sentinel to a vanished past. The National Park Service has refurbished the interior to its historic 1880s appearance - a reminder of a bygone era. Ranger-led talks, displays, and brochures are available to explain the lighthouse’s interesting past.

Cabrillo National Monument, San Diego. As the park’s namesake, Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo led the first European expedition to explore what is now the west coast of the United States. Cabrillo departed from the port of Navidad, Mexico, on June 27, 1542. Three months later he arrived at "a very good enclosed port," which is known today as San Diego Bay. Historians believe he anchored his flagship, the San Salvador, on Point Loma's east shore near Cabrillo National Monument. Cabrillo later died during the expedition, but his crew pushed on, possibly as far north as Oregon, before thrashing winter storms forced them to back to Mexico.

Cabrillo National Monument Visitor Center, San Diego. The Visitor Center is a good place to start your day at Cabrillo National Monument. The "Age of Exploration" exhibit, films, and ranger-guided programs present interesting insights into the history of Cabrillo, and rangers and volunteers are available to offer suggestions on what to see.

Cabrillo National Monument, San Diego

California

1935 (Old) Cactus Garden. This historic garden was developed under the direction of Kate Sessions for the 1935 California Pacific International Exposition. It contains some of the largest cactus and succulent specimens in the Park and has also been developed to include the exotic African and Australian Protea plants. It is located on the west side of the Balboa Park Club.

Lawn Bowling. Balboa Park's lawn bowling area is nestled on the NE side of the Cabrillo Bridge. Organized in 1931 with 5 founding members, the San Diego Lawn Bowling Club is still going strong with more than 100 members. Members are always picturesquely dressed in white-striking against the green of the lawn bowling grass. Play occurs on Tuesday and Saturday at 9:30a; Wednesday, Friday, Sunday at 1:00p; and Thursday at 10a. (Members of the club also give lessons.)