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CC Cycle 1 Week 5 Pax Romana - The Roman peace; the long period of stability under the Roman Empire

CC Cycle 1 Week 5 Pax Romana - The Roman peace; the long period of stability under the Roman Empire

Melting pot: This map shows the ethnic heritage of Americans:

The map that shows where America came from: Fascinating illustration shows the ancestry of EVERY county in the US

40 maps that explain the Roman Empire - Vox

40 maps that explain the Roman Empire

The decline of the Mughal empire and Indian disunity contributed to British success. Agents of the British East India Company were drawn into local wars as the Mughal empire disintegrated during the eighteenth century.

The decline of the Mughal empire and Indian disunity contributed to British success. Agents of the British East India Company were drawn into local wars as the Mughal empire disintegrated during the eighteenth century.

Religions in Poland in 1750

Religions in Poland in 1750

Throughout much of the peninsula dwelt the Italic tribes. They had migrated around 1000 BC from somewhere within modern Slovenia, near the ancient town of Hallstatt. By 500 BC the strongest of the tribes were the Samnites.  Across the Adriatic Sea lived the Illyrians. Sometime around 1000 BC one of their tribes, the Messapians, crossed and established themselves in the heel of the peninsula.

Throughout much of the peninsula dwelt the Italic tribes. They had migrated around 1000 BC from somewhere within modern Slovenia, near the ancient town of Hallstatt. By 500 BC the strongest of the tribes were the Samnites. Across the Adriatic Sea lived the Illyrians. Sometime around 1000 BC one of their tribes, the Messapians, crossed and established themselves in the heel of the peninsula.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2014/01/13/40-more-maps-that-explain-the-world/

40 more maps that explain the world

"All Roads Lead to Rome", that's what we hear all the time, but is it actually true? In reality the Romans built about 50,000 miles of roads throughout their empire, that connected Britain to the Tigris River and the Danube River to Spain and the Iberian Peninsula. These roads were mainly used for military reason to mobilize troops fast and efficiently. The first known road was called the Via Appia and stretched from Rome to the current day city of Taranto in Italy, which is about 334 miles.

"All Roads Lead to Rome", that's what we hear all the time, but is it actually true? In reality the Romans built about 50,000 miles of roads throughout their empire, that connected Britain to the Tigris River and the Danube River to Spain and the Iberian Peninsula. These roads were mainly used for military reason to mobilize troops fast and efficiently. The first known road was called the Via Appia and stretched from Rome to the current day city of Taranto in Italy, which is about 334 miles.