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NYT Cooking: Salade Lyonnaise

Salade Lyonnaise

Salad Lyonnaise: Mark Bittman prepares an essential French salad with fresh greens, bacon and egg.

Soft and luxurious, bathed in an emulsified mixture of sesame paste and peanut butter, rendered vivid and fiery by chili oil and sweetened by sugar, then cut by vinegar, this version brings home what used to be classic New York takeout. (Photo: Tony Cenicola/The New York Times)

Takeout-Style Sesame Noodles

Cold Sesame Noodles: Eddie Schoenfeld, the affable yarn-spinner and restaurateur who opened Red Farm in the West Village and on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, is also one of New York's finest practitioners of Chinese cuisine.

Cherry Tomato Caesar Salad Recipe - NYT Cooking

Cherry Tomato Caesar Salad

NYT Cooking: In 1975, Eli Zabar, the owner of E.A.T., Eli's at the Vinegar Factory and numerous restaurants and markets throughout the city, invented what he calls the platonic ideal of an egg salad sandwich. He did it by eliminating half the egg whites. During this period, he was into simplicity, he said, and he wanted to get to the essential “egginess” of egg salad. The recipe%...

Eli Zabar’s Egg Salad Sandwich

In Eli Zabar, the owner of E., Eli's at the Vinegar Factory and numerous restaurants and markets throughout the city, invented what he calls the platonic ideal of an egg salad sandwich He did it by eliminating half the egg whites During this per

NYT Cooking: This salad is made from uncooked broccoli tossed with an assertive garlic, sesame, chile and cumin-seed vinaigrette slicked with good extra-virgin olive oil and red wine vinegar. The acid “cooks” the florets a little as ceviche does fish. After an hour, the broccoli softens as if blanched, turning bright emerald, and soaking up all the intense flavors of the dressing. You’ll be making this one again.

Broccoli Salad With Garlic and Sesame

NYT Cooking: This salad is made from uncooked broccoli tossed with an assertive garlic, sesame, chile and cumin-seed vinaigrette slicked with good extra-virgin olive oil and red wine vinegar. The acid “cooks” the florets a little as ceviche does fish.

NYT Cooking: If this sounds like a pared-down salade niçoise, it is. Make a bold vinaigrette that is unapologetically fragrant with garlic and anchovy. Boil medium-size potatoes in their skins. Peel, slice and dress them while they are still slightly warm. You can even do the work in advance and then assemble it all just before serving. Authentic, traditional or somewhere in between, m...

French Potato and Green Bean Salad

French Potato and Green Bean Salad this sounds like a pared-down salade niçoise, it is Make a bold vinaigrette that is unapologetically fragrant with garlic and anchovy Boil medium-size potatoes in their skins

http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1018114-warm-kale-coconut-and-tomato-salad

Warm Kale, Coconut and Tomato Salad

Warm kale, coconut and tomato salad. NYT Cooking: This stylish recipe for a warm kale salad comes from Anna Jones, a British food stylist who worked for Jamie Oliver before striking out on her own.

Asparagus takes easily to many kinds of seasonings, so after you’ve tired of having it plain with butter or homemade mayonnaise, try this spicy dressing laced with ginger and chiles. Adding smoked chicken is a nice way to make a more substantial first course or light lunch. You can purchase smoked chicken at better butcher shops or online, but equally good is grilled chicken at room temperature, or cold poached chicken. I sometimes substitute lightly smoked ham or smoked slab bacon, simmered…

Asparagus and Chicken Salad With Ginger Dressing

NYT Cooking: Fresh raw corn shucked from the cob is ideal here. The juice from the tomatoes delivers just the right amount of acidity, so there’s no need for vinegar. Eat this by the bowl as is or toss it with cooked rice or beans for a more filling salad (add oil and vinegar accordingly). In midsummer, with a couple of thick tomato slices, there is nothing better.

Corn Salad With Tomatoes, Feta and Mint

NYT Cooking: Fresh raw corn shucked from the cob is ideal here. The juice from the tomatoes delivers just the right amount of acidity, so there’s no need for…

Vietnamese Lemon Grass Beef and Noodle Salad

Vietnamese Lemon Grass Beef and Noodle Salad

NYT Cooking: Caesar salad, done right, is a bowl full of contrasts: cool, watery leaves against dry, crunchy croutons

Kale-Romaine Caesar Salad

NYT Cooking: Kale-Romaine Caesar salad, done right, is a bowl full of contrasts: cool, watery leaves against dry, crunchy croutons

NYT Cooking: Pungent arugula contrasts beautifully with fruit of all kinds. Grilling the apricots deepens their flavor and makes them stand out against the arugula even more. You’ll be able to make this beautiful salad only during the summer’s short apricot season, and even then, you should buy the fruits at the farmers’ market so you can sample them to make sure they are juicy and sweet.

Arugula Salad With Grilled Apricots and Pistachios

NYT Cooking: Pungent arugula contrasts beautifully with fruit of all kinds. Grilling the apricots deepens their flavor and makes them stand out against the…

The best place for a salad on the Thanksgiving menu is at the beginning of the meal, before everybody fills up. We often pass around plates of this vegetarian chopped salad (no bacon) to accompany the drinks before we sit down at the table.  (Photo: Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times)

Chopped Salad With Apples, Walnuts and Bitter Lettuces

NYT Cooking: This schnitzel is light and crunchy with a crust that rises like a soufflé. The secret is to trap air in the crust when you cook the meat by moving and shaking the pan (Ms. Clark demonstrates with pork in <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/video/dining/100000003169872/pork-schnitzel-with-quick-pickles.html?playlistId=1194820411913&region=video-grid&version=video-grid-headline&contentCollection=&contentPlace...

Crisp Chicken Schnitzel With Lemony Herb Salad

This schnitzel is light and crunchy with a crust that rises like a soufflé. The secret is to trap air in the crust when you cook the meat by moving and shaking the pan (Ms Clark demonstrates with pork

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