Olive Oatman, given facial tattoo by Native Americans who abducted her in the 1850s

Many Victorian mothers, while intending to provide the best food and feeding methods for their infants, tragically caused the deaths of their own little ones. Although doctors condemned the bottles and infant mortality rates of the time were shocking – only two out of ten infants lived to their second birthday – parents continued to buy and use them. The bottles eventually earned the nickname, “Murder Bottles.”

The White Slave Woman Tattooed by her Native-American Family.

Sylvia Likens murder is one of the most atrocious cases of child abuse ever. Three movies have been made about her and her tragic life.

Here is the story: Dead children tied to a tree, Village of Kobzowa (powiat of Tarnopol), 1923. Four killed Roma children tied to tree by their mentally ill mother after her husband was arrested and her Roma group dissolved. The murder took place in night of 11/12 December 1923.

They lay forgotten in a dank cellar for almost a century. But these remarkable photos, published for the first time, give a rare and uncensored view of the horrors of the First World War from behind enemy lines. The images provide an insight into the epic machinery of war – and capture the darkest moments of battle, with bodies strewn among the rubble.

10 Facial Reconstructions of Famous Historical Figures | Mental Floss

The haunting portrait of an Armenia woman with tattoos on her face, indicates that she was ‘owned’ by someone as a forced wife and sex-slave during the years of the Armenian Genocide. "Grandma’s Tattoos" unveils the story of the Armenian women driven out of Ottoman Turkey during the First World War-Armenian Genocide.

Three Horses, Native American, photographed by Edward Curtis in 1905. Three Horses, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing front, wearing headdress.

Despite the awfulness of her predicament, this Jewish woman manages to smile brightly for the camera as she poses for Hugo Jaeger, Hitler's Personal photographer who captured for history the plight of the Jews in Nazi-occupied Poland

Photos Of Chernobyl 28 Years Later

Willie Vicarage, who was suffering from facial wounds that he sustained in the Battle of Jutland in 1916, was one of the first men to receive facial reconstruction using plastic surgery. Read more at http://www.oddee.com/item_98767.aspx#tzDkoIjARPLHpBej.99

"Why isn't this in our history books?" Unfortunately, we all know, right?

Michael Jackson

Mary Ellen Wilson (1864–1956) or sometimes Mary Ellen McCormack was an American whose case of child abuse led to the creation of the New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. As an eight-year old, she was severely abused by her foster parents, Francis and Mary Connolly.

Olive Oatman (1837-1903) was a woman from Illinois who was famously abducted by a Native American tribe (likely the Yavapai people), then sold to another (the Mohave people).[1] She ultimately regained her freedom five years later. The story resonated in the media, partly owing to the prominent blue tattooing of Oatman's face by her captors. In subsequent years, the tale of Olive Oatman came to be retold with dramatic license in novels, plays, and poetry.

A Black & White Photo That Cannot Be Explained

Black Hair, Native American, photographed by Edward Curtis in 1905. Black Hair, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing front.

A picture of a boy named George, forced into a frilly dress. The basket he's holding contains bay leaves, which in the Victorian language of flowers means "I change but in death". His twin sister died and his parents wanted a keepsake of her so this was the nearest they could get. I imagine they found comfort in it, but it seems quite strange to me.