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Nikon MicroscopyU | Small World Competition | 2003

Edward Kinsman, Kinsman Physics Productions - Rochester, New York, USA Specimen: Snowflake Technique: Fiber optic illumination

Cris Orfescu, "3D Glasses Only", 2011, Nanosculpture: mixture of graphite nano and microparticles visualized with a scanning electron microscope, captured in a computer, painted and manipulated digitally, and printed with archival inks on fine art paper.

Cris Orfescu, "3D Glasses Only", 2011, Nanosculpture: mixture of graphite nano and microparticles visualized with a scanning electron microscope, captured in a computer, painted and manipulated digitally, and printed with archival inks on fine art paper.

A HeLa cell undergoing apoptosis (middle), or programmed cell death, surrounded by healthy neighbors.  Image by Thomas Deerinck and Mark Ellisman, UCSD.

Programmed cell death (apoptosis) -This tightly regulated process removes damaged cells. Here, multiphoton fluorescence imaging reveals an apoptotic HeLa cell (middle) amongst non-dying neighbors.

Image result for human skin cells

Calendula officinalis Extracts Protect against Induced Chromosome Damage on HacaT Human Skin Cells

Linden Gledhill - Snowflake

Heart of a snowflake using DIC microscopy

Human Red Blood Cells Science Image | blood1 | Science Image from PSmicrographs

SEM- view- Lance Armstrong used these as his steroid. He recycled them back into his bloodstream for more oxygen/power/movement/strength. Sabrina fact so sue me.

A real snowflake! In such pristine condition too!   Researchers at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Maryland used an electron microscope super-cooled to -170 degrees Celsius to capture some rarely seen views of snowflakes. In this image, hexagonal snow crystals with broad branches can be seen. (Photo courtesy of emu.arsusda.gov)

The Electron Microscopy Unit of the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Beltsville, Maryland took some amazing images of snowflakes shot using an electron microscope. via Wired Science

This is what ocean sand looks like -- magnified by 250 times, Amazing!

Photographs of sand magnified 250 times, by Gary Greenberg via owls-love-tea (WOAH! no way! also, I choose to believe that all grains of sand are secretly heart-shaped)

Microscopy: 1980: Zirconium tube oxidized in high temperature steam, polished and etched (26x) polarized light

Microscopy: Zirconium tube oxidized in high temperature steam, polished and etched polarized light

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