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  • Chere Brown

    Andrew Jackson Higgins (28 August 1886 – 1 August 1952) was the founder of Higgins Industries, the New Orleans manufacturer of "Higgins boats" (LCVPs) during World War II. General Dwight Eisenhower is quoted as saying, "Andrew Higgins ... is the man who won the war for us. ... If Higgins had not designed and built those LCVPs, we never could have landed over an open beach. The whole strategy of the war would have been different."

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