Civil War, [portrait of a gentleman after amputation]  via Flesh World, “Masterpieces of Medical Photography”

Civil War, [portrait of a gentleman after amputation] via Flesh World, “Masterpieces of Medical Photography”

Samuel Decker was a Civil War veteran who built his own prosthetics after loosing his arms in combat.

Samuel Decker was a Civil War veteran who built his own prosthetics after loosing his arms in combat.

Photograph taken during President Abraham Lincoln’s funeral when his casket was temporarily placed in the receiving vault of Oak Ridge Cemetery in Springfield, Illinois, May 4, 1865.

Photograph taken during President Abraham Lincoln’s funeral when his casket was temporarily placed in the receiving vault of Oak Ridge Cemetery in Springfield, Illinois, May 4, 1865.

Irony Level Ten: Did Varnia Howell Davis, First Lady Of The Confederacy, Have African Ancestry?

Irony Level Ten: Did Varnia Howell Davis, First Lady Of The Confederacy, Have African Ancestry?

In the lull between battles, even amid the ruckus of a bustling nighttime camp, a letter from home was a priceless treasure of hope.

In the lull between battles, even amid the ruckus of a bustling nighttime camp, a letter from home was a priceless treasure of hope.

Grant crossing the James River in 1865 - the beginning of the end for the Confederacy, and General Lee knew it

Grant crossing the James River in 1865 - the beginning of the end for the Confederacy, and General Lee knew it

General Stonewall Jackson -- His Calvinist views inspired reckless bravery on the battlefield, but his beard will forever inspire visitors on my beard-board

General Stonewall Jackson -- His Calvinist views inspired reckless bravery on the battlefield, but his beard will forever inspire visitors on my beard-board

CDV of Private L. Coombs, 4th US Infantry seated with his prosthesis (ca. 1865)  Seventy-five percent of all operations in the Civil War were amputations as surgeons soon discovered that the quick removal of a traumatized limb was the most effective way to save lives. Civil War survivors with limb prostheses became a common sight throughout the latter part of the nineteenth century.

CDV of Private L. Coombs, 4th US Infantry seated with his prosthesis (ca. 1865) Seventy-five percent of all operations in the Civil War were amputations as surgeons soon discovered that the quick removal of a traumatized limb was the most effective way to save lives. Civil War survivors with limb prostheses became a common sight throughout the latter part of the nineteenth century.

Pinterest • The world’s catalog of ideas
Search