More to explore:

Troops

Visit site

Related Pins

Atlanta, Georgia. Sherman's men destroying railroad

William Tecumseh Sherman, one of the most ruthless of Yankee generals in the Civil War. I have relatives who to this day refuse to buy a lawnmower powered by a Tecumseh motor.

Atlanta in the Civil War before Gen. Sherman burned the city to the ground.

Atlanta, Georgia… Sherman’s Men Tearing Up Railroad Track. Photographed in 1864 by Barnard, George N. Sherman’s 62,000 men marched out of Atlanta “into the fat fields of Georgia like locusts devouring the land”, Sherman tore up every mile of railroad track and almost every station.

Atlanta, Georgia… Sherman’s Men Tearing Up Railroad Track. Photographed in 1864 by Barnard

The merchandise being auctioned is described by a chilling sign on the front of the establishment, "Auction and Negro Sales". The building is a slave auction house in the south. While this is a very sad picture, taken in 1864, the institution of slavery was near extinction in the US. Slavery would end in 1865 with Lee's surrender to Grant at Appomattox Courthouse. Happily on this day (July 28) in the year 1868, the 14th amendment to the US constitution was passed, giving full citizenship to Afri

Atlanta, Georgia Trout House, Masonic Hall, and Federal encampment on Decatur Street. It was made in 1864

Following the evacuation of Atlanta, Confederate forces blew up Hood's ammunition train leading to the first burning of Atlanta on the early morning hours of Sep. 1, 1864. Photo from Atlanta Resurgens (Atlanta: First National Bank of Atlanta, 1971), p. 17

Barbarous General Sherman burned Atlanta to the ground and destroyed vast areas of the Confederacy. His troops were responsible for wide-scale property destruction, rape, murder, arson and theft from the people of Georgia and South Carolina on particular.

4th U.S. Colored Troops, Civil War by Brendan Hamilton, via Flickr

Atlanta, Georgia… Sherman’s Men Tearing Up Railroad Track. Photographed in 1864 by Barnard, George N. Sherman’s 62,000 men marched out of Atlanta “into the fat fields of Georgia like locusts devouring the land”, Sherman tore up every mile of railroad track and almost every station. Shermans Neckties

Portrait of Major General (as of Apr. 15, 1865) George A. Custer, officer of the Federal Army]. It was made between 1860 and 1865 by Brady National Photographic Art Gallery (Washington, D.C.).