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The first woman to ask for divorce and lead an army, Eleanor of Aquitaine lived until she was 82 (pretty good considering most died in their 40s). She got a formal education, which was really rare for women in that era. There are rumours that she poisoned her second husband Henry IIs mistress, the Fair Rosamund.  This ladys bad-ass.

Eleanor of Aquitaine, wife of two kings: Louis VII of France & Henry II of England, mother of two more: Richard the Lionhearted & Nasty King John (yes, that's his official title, in my book, anyway); she went on a Crusade with Louis & ruled England temporarily in Richard's absence in the Holy Land.

Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122 or 1124 – April 1, 1204) - One of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Western Europe during the High Middle Ages. One tough chick, generally speaking.

Eleanor of Aquitaine (c.1122-1204) bore Henry II of England 3 daughters & 5 sons. In addition to being Queen Consort, Eleanor regained her position as Duchess of Aquitaine & ruled her home state independently; she was an excellent ruler & she was much beloved by her people. Eleanor & Henry (pictured here) were a match politically & romantically, although sometimes Henry's eye wandered. But his brief affairs were never a threat to Eleanor until he became infatuated with Rosamund Clifford.

Look at this lady - Let us never forget! The world hasn't just become wicked...it's always been wicked. The prize doesn't always go to the most deserving. Irena Sendler Died 12 May 2008 (age 98) Warsaw, Poland During WWII, Irena, got permission to work in the Warsaw ghetto, as a Plumbing/Sewer specialist. She had an 'ulterior motive'. She KNEW what the Nazi's plans were for the Jews (being German). Irena smuggled infants out in the bottom of her tool box .

Seventy metal books found in cave in Jordan - They’re small “books,” but they could be one of the biggest finds in Christian history. 70 tiny, lead tablets, bound with wire, were found in the last five years in Jordan, and some say they could offer key details of the early church, the final years of Jesus’s life, and may even be referenced in the book of Revelation. In fact, they could even predate the writings of St. Paul. Hassan Saida with some of the artefacts that he says he inherited…

Eleanor of Aquitaine (in French: Aliénor d’Aquitaine, Éléonore de Guyenne) (1122 or 1124 – 1 April 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Western Europe during the High Middle Ages. As well as being Duchess of Aquitaine in her own right, she was queen consort of France (1137–1152) and of England (1154–1189).

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Sent to the asylum: The Victorian women locked up because they were suffering from stress, post natal depression and anxiety

Eliza Josolyne. Diagnosis: Insanity caused by overwork. These days, work stress, postnatal depression and anxiety may be addressed with compassion. But just a few generations ago, the women who suffered from these conditions, were confined to an asylum.

“Mad as a hatter” In 18th and 19th century England mercury was used in the production of felt, which was used in the manufacturing of hats common of the time. People who worked in these hat factories were exposed daily to trace amounts of the metal, which accumulated within their bodies over time, causing some workers to develop dementia caused by mercury poisoning. Thus the phrase “Mad as a Hatter” became popular as a way to refer to someone who was perceived as insane.

Lady Sarah Forbes Bonetta Davies (photographed by Camille Silvy, 1862) Born into a royal West African dynasty, orphaned in 1848 at around five years old, when her parents were killed in a slave-hunting war. In 1850, Sarah was taken to England and presented to Queen Victoria as a “gift” from the King of Dahomey. She became the queen’s goddaughter and a celebrity known for her extraordinary intelligence. She cries out to become a character in a better story than real history affords her...

Eleanor of Aquitaine: The only woman to be a Queen of both England and France. She was married to Henry II of England, and mother of Richard the Lionhearted & his scheming brother, later King John. Eleanor & Henry had a tumultuous marriage; even after that marriage fell apart, Eleanor had a very eventful life. For a glimpse into her marriage to Henry II, see the classic movie, "The Lion in Winter" (1968), with Peter O'Toole and Katherine Hepburn in the starring roles.

While most people remember Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King, they forget that the Montgomery Bus Boycott succeeded because of the participation of tens of thousands of ordinary people. These women and men risked their lives and jobs to keep the boycott alive. Many, like this woman, walked instead of riding the segregated buses.

Hatshepsut is one of the most powerful women in the ancient world and one of the best monks in ancient Egypt. She was the fifth pharaoh of the eighteenth dynasty of Egypt and ruled longer than any ruler in Egyptian history.

King tut still born baby girl found in his tomb DNA test also found she had Marfan Syndrome one other baby was also found with king tut that was much smaller then this one. These two tiny babies are the only examples of Mummified fetuses in all of Ancient Egypt.

Abandoned town- Oradour-Sur-Glane.This town was abandoned because the Nazis rounded all the citizens up and killed them. France left the entire town untouched as a memorial. The people were buried, but the items; cars, bikes, baby carriages, still remain. (Mena =)

She's one of the world's best-preserved bodies: Rosalia Lombardo, a two-year-old Sicilian girl who died of pneumonia in 1920. "Sleeping Beauty," as she's known, appears to be merely dozing beneath the glass front of her coffin in the Capuchin Catacombs of Palermo, Italy.