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    • John Kirton

      The Iron Giant (1999) In rustic 1957 Maine, 9-year-old Hogarth finds a colossal but disoriented robot (of unknown origin), and the two form a strong bond of friendship. Before long, however, a government agent is on their trail -- and he's intent on destroying the automaton. This beautifully rendered parable based on British poet Ted Hughes' feted short story features the voices of Jennifer Aniston, Vin Diesel, Harry Connick Jr. and Cloris Leachman.

    • Jody Webster

      One of my favorite movies of all time... The Iron Giant

    • Rachel Adler

      Movie Poster Art: The Iron Giant (1999) - the animation and character design in this movie was some of THE BEST in any animated movie in my opinion

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