World War II

This was my father's war. He worked at the local bomber plant while in high school, and transported the pilots to the plant. When he graduated, he joined as an MP and saw service in France, Belgium, Germany, and the Netherlands. I will not post pictures of any German leaders on this board; I will never condone their actions.


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World War II

World War II

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hell's gate .. the main entrance to auschwitz concentration camp ...

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Remembering Pearl Harbor

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General Auguste Paul Nogues (left), the French resident-general of Morocco, and Major General George S. Patton, Jr., at a parade in Rabat af...

Historical Photos | The Liberation Trilogy, by Rick Atkinson

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The street art of Wartime London, 1941.

Once Upon A Time In War

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The Normandy landing that you didn't see. 1944, Red Cross workers.

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D-Day: The Normandy Invasion. Army Air Corps photographers documented D-Day beach traffic, as photographed from a Ninth Air Force bomber on June 6, 1944. Note vehicle lanes leading away from the landing areas, and landing craft left aground by the tide. Some of the black dots are dead soldiers

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Brig. Gen. Leslie R. Groves and J. Robert Oppenheimer working on the Manhattan Project.

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1945 ... 'Little Boy' atomic bomb

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USS Indianapolis at Mare Island, just prior to her fateful trip, July 12, 1945.

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The American B-17G "Powerful Poodle" takes a direct hit from flak over Ludwigshafen, Germany during her tenth, and last, sortie. She went down at 11:25, Nov. 5, 1944. All of the crew were killed. Note the bombs falling from the plane above her.

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General George C. Marshall, Chief of Staff of the U.S. Armed Forces during World War 2, 1944.

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D-Day

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Army Chaplain Francis L. Sampson of Sioux Falls, S.D., gives absolution to American paratroopers killed in action, in Saint Marie Dumont, France, U.S. Army Photo, 7 June 1944 (Note that bodies are wrapped in parachutes)

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Men and assault vehicles storm the Normandy Beach of France, as allied landing craft arrive at their destination on D-Day, June 6, 1944. Note men coming ashore in surf and vehicles starting inland. (AP Photo)

D-Day Photos June 6, 1944

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D-day

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Ike addressing the troops before the D-Day invasion. The soldier with the sign that says 23 is from Saginaw, Michigan

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D-Day

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D-Day, 70 years ago

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Last of original group of Navajo Code Talkers dies. Since they used a special language that only the Navajo knew, they were used to send messages that could not be translated, and helped us win the war. Their service will never be forgotten

Last of original group of Navajo Code Talkers dies

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U.S. soldiers scale the seawall of Utah Beach in Normandy during one of the bloodiest battle during the Second World War. Photo dated June 6, 1944. Photo: US National Archives

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USS Arizona

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B-24 Liberator Bomber „Twin Nifties II”

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Cmdr Ed Beach was one of the most decorated and heroic submarine commanders in the US navy during WW2. He was incredibly brave and sank many enemy ships under adverse conditions.He represents all that Americans are and will be again when whenever we need them. I have seen his name on many WW2 films as technical advisor. Nice to put a face to a name.

Edward L. Beach, Jr. - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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LST unloading a Cromwell tank onto Sword Beach, Normandy, France on June 7, 1944.

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The Invasion Begins: The D-Day invasion, spread over five beaches, was one of the largest amphibious military assaults in history. The five Normandy beaches were codenamed Omaha, Utah, Gold, Juno and Sword.

Remembering D-Day — History.com Photo Galleries

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