The War Torn Cross, the fourth battle flag of the 26th Tennessee Infantry. August Depot issue, 1864

The War Torn Cross, the fourth battle flag of the 26th Tennessee Infantry. August Depot issue, 1864

Flag of the Brown Mountain Boys  from west-central Stokes County. Part of the Second Battalion North Carolina Infantry, the Brown Mountain boys landed on Roanoke Island on the morning of February 8, 1862, just in time to become part of the Confederate surrender to Federal forces. The flag was taken and kept as a souvenir by a member of the Twenty-seventh Massachusetts until its purchase by the North Carolina Museum of History Associates, Inc. in 1987.

Flag of the Brown Mountain Boys from west-central Stokes County. Part of the Second Battalion North Carolina Infantry, the Brown Mountain boys landed on Roanoke Island on the morning of February 8, 1862, just in time to become part of the Confederate surrender to Federal forces. The flag was taken and kept as a souvenir by a member of the Twenty-seventh Massachusetts until its purchase by the North Carolina Museum of History Associates, Inc. in 1987.

The only flag known to exist from the Second Georgia Infantry Regiment of the Confederate Army, made in 1860.

The only flag known to exist from the Second Georgia Infantry Regiment of the Confederate Army, made in 1860.

Flag of the Lowry Rifles - Company D, 6th Mississippi Infantry  The Lowry Rifles eventually became Company D, 6th Mississippi Infantry, and they saw their first combat at Rhea's Field on April 6, 1862. The 6th Mississippi went into the fight with 425 men - of that number, 48 were killed, and 247 wounded, for a casualty rate of 70.5 percent. The regiment earned the name "The Bloody Sixth," at Shiloh, and they proudly carried that title until the end of the war.

Flag of the Lowry Rifles - Company D, 6th Mississippi Infantry The Lowry Rifles eventually became Company D, 6th Mississippi Infantry, and they saw their first combat at Rhea's Field on April 6, 1862. The 6th Mississippi went into the fight with 425 men - of that number, 48 were killed, and 247 wounded, for a casualty rate of 70.5 percent. The regiment earned the name "The Bloody Sixth," at Shiloh, and they proudly carried that title until the end of the war.

Battle flags tennessee | Battery at Fort Donelson overlooking the Cumberland River. 18th Tennessee Regiment

Battle flags tennessee | Battery at Fort Donelson overlooking the Cumberland River. 18th Tennessee Regiment

U.S. 35 Star, 2nd Tenn. Vol. Cav., National Veteran Funeral Flag. The flag is attributed to the Civil War via its association with both Charles Berry and Major James Berry, as indicated by the family history. This Civil War era flag also has a history of post-war GAR encampment use.

U.S. 35 Star, 2nd Tenn. Vol. Cav., National Veteran Funeral Flag. The flag is attributed to the Civil War via its association with both Charles Berry and Major James Berry, as indicated by the family history. This Civil War era flag also has a history of post-war GAR encampment use.

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