Ancient Artifacts


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Ancient Artifacts

Ancient Artifacts

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Sleeping Cat, mid- to late 19th century Kaigyokusai (Masatsugu) (Japan, Osaka, 1813-09-13 - 1892-01-21) Netsuke, Ivory with sumi, red pigment AC1998.249.80 Los Angeles County Museum of Art via lilacs and wild geese.

garden of the far east

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Helmet Italian 1550 CE Embossed Steel

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Kneeling Bull holding a Spouted Vessel. Silver. Southwestern Iran. ca. 3100-2900 BCE.

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Now known as "the Bäckaskog Woman", this Stone Age hunter and fisher was buried in Kiaby, Skåne at the age of 45. The funeral took place in springtime, when birch and hazel were in bloom. The Bäckaskog woman is the oldest and most famous skeleton found in Sweden. In her grave, a spear head was found, suitable for hunting and fishing, made of bone and sharp flint blades. Because of the grave goods archaeologists first thought she was a man, and she was known as "the Fisherman" for many years

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3000 to 5000 year old pottery, Gonur Depe, Turkmenistan

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Roman Gold Ring | 3rd Century AD Roman | Gold | Jewelry | eTiquities by Phoenix Ancient Art

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Ancient Roman Perfume & Cologne Glass Bottles

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Ancient Phoenician. Fused glass beads of various colors and designs. Restrung into a necklace. 500-300 BC (24”)

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Centuripe vase, greek 400-375 BCE

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extraordinary neolithic stone carving dating back approximately 5,000 years. Located in Ketley Crag, Northumberland (North East England) Some experts believe they may have played a role in fire, feastings and offering activities, or been used as ‘signposts’, or to mark territory. Others point to a spiritual significance.

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Enthroned Female Goddess of this type spread far and wide as the Greek and Roman world adopts veneration of the Mater Deum, Mother of the Gods. 7th C., Greek perhaps from Italy.

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The alabaster ‘Ashtart of Galera, Granada also known as the Canaanite goddess. Brought to Iberia by Phoenicians; made by Syrian or Lebanese artisans ca 250 BCE; spanish burial ca. 450 BCE. The enthroned fertile goddess flanked by actual or mythical animals is a constant image throughout the mediterranean and into Central Asia.

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1000-500 BC Female Mesopotamian Figure Terracotta figurines of standing nude women are the most common type of Babylonian votive. Sometimes the figure clasps her hands in front of her, as seen here, while in other examples the figure holds her breasts or suckles a baby. These mass-produced fertility figurines served as votive offerings or as charms to aid in conception and childbirth. In Search of Ancient Treasure: 40 Years of Collecting. The Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore. 1978.

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Sculpture found in the underground neolithic Temple of Malta, 3300BC

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The 2200 year old hand of Old Croghan man - An Irish bog mummy. Old Croghan man was found in a bog beneath Croghan Hill in Co. Offaly and based on radiocarbon dating he died sometime between 362 BC and 175 BC . He was extremely tall measuring 6ft 6 in height and had well manicured hands suggesting that he was not used to manual labour. His last meal (analysed from the contents in his stomach) consisted of cereals and milk

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Clonycavan man, 5ft 2 in height, was recovered from a bog in Co. Meath and only his upper torso and head survived. The remains were radiocarbon dated to between 392 BC and 201 BC and, unusually, his hair was spiked with pine resin, a very early form of hair gel. Furthermore, the trees from which the resin was sourced only grow in Spain and south-west France, indicating the presence of long distance trade routes.

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The Babylonian World Map, the earliest surviving map of the world (c. 600 BCE). It is a symbolic, not a literal representation. It deliberately omits peoples such as the Persians and Egyptians, who were well known to the Babylonians. The area shown is depicted as a circular shape surrounded by water, which fits the religious image of the world in which the Babylonians believed.

File:Baylonianmaps.JPG - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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from area of present day Balochistan, 6,000-3,000 BC

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A head of La Dama de Elche from Alicante, circa 500 BCE. The feather-like pattern of the crown is found in Canaanite and Greek art, where it appears in headdresses of goddesses.

La Dama de ELche and Other Iberian Heads

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Ancient Etruscan bronze sea horse

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Stone henge with full moon.

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The oldest water clock (or "clepsydra") known, the Egyptian "hourglass of Karnak," dating to around 1400 BC

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Two life-sized lion sculptures, made by the Hittites, have been found in Turkey. Now archaeologists are trying to figure out what they were for. One idea is that the statues, created between 1400 and 1200 B.C., were meant to be part of a monument for a sacred water spring, the researchers said. The lifelike lions were created by the Hittites who controlled a vast empire in the region at a time when the Asiatic lion roamed the foothills of Turkey.

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The tomb of Herod the Great has been found in Israel

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Map of the World, 6th century BC (The Trustees of the British Museum)

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