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From the book Foraging & Feasting: A Field Guide and Wild Food Cookbook by Dina Falconi; illustrated by Wendy Hollender.

From the book Foraging & Feasting: A Field Guide and Wild Food Cookbook by Dina Falconi; illustrated by Wendy Hollender.

Rose hip oil (which smells nothing like roses!) helps reduce scarring and stretch marks, and it is also known as a potent anti-aging treatment to help with wrinkles and fine lines. A rich source of vitamin A plus Omega 6 and Omega 3 essential fatty acids, rosehip oil is light and non greasy.

Rose hip oil (which smells nothing like roses!) helps reduce scarring and stretch marks, and it is also known as a potent anti-aging treatment to help with wrinkles and fine lines. A rich source of vitamin A plus Omega 6 and Omega 3 essential fatty acids, rosehip oil is light and non greasy.

Chamomile is one of the most recognized and used herbs in the western world. From tea and tinctures to salves and soap, chamomile’s versatility and aroma have long-been welcomed into our lives. Check out the link for 23 ways to use chamomile in many different applications – not just tea! Herbal Academy of New England

Chamomile is one of the most recognized and used herbs in the western world. From tea and tinctures to salves and soap, chamomile’s versatility and aroma have long-been welcomed into our lives. Check out the link for 23 ways to use chamomile in many different applications – not just tea! Herbal Academy of New England

Chokecherry Identification & Foraging wild edibles and how to use chokecherries | Montana Homesteader:

Chokecherry Identification & Foraging wild edibles and how to use chokecherries | Montana Homesteader:

How to Make a Tincture: It does not matter what size jar you use as long as the top one quarter is liquid. Dry herbs lose their potency within a year. Fresh herbs rot soon after harvest. Tinctures preserve and extract the medicinal properties of an herb in an alcoholic extract, and can last more than a hundred years. You can purchase tinctures, or you can make your own. They are very easy to make.

How to Make a Tincture: It does not matter what size jar you use as long as the top one quarter is liquid. Dry herbs lose their potency within a year. Fresh herbs rot soon after harvest. Tinctures preserve and extract the medicinal properties of an herb in an alcoholic extract, and can last more than a hundred years. You can purchase tinctures, or you can make your own. They are very easy to make.

From the book Foraging & Feasting: A Field Guide and Wild Food Cookbook by Dina Falconi, illustrated by Wendy Hollender

From the book Foraging & Feasting: A Field Guide and Wild Food Cookbook by Dina Falconi, illustrated by Wendy Hollender

Comfrey (Symphytum officinale) Plant Identification page from our book Foraging & Feasting: A Field Guide and Wild Food Cookbook by Dina Falconi; illustrated by Wendy Hollender.

Comfrey (Symphytum officinale) Plant Identification page from our book Foraging & Feasting: A Field Guide and Wild Food Cookbook by Dina Falconi; illustrated by Wendy Hollender.

How to Make Wildflower Mead~ A one gallon mead recipe with flowers from your yard! www.growforagecookferment.com

How to Make Wildflower Mead~ A one gallon mead recipe with flowers from your yard! www.growforagecookferment.com