Richárd Zgyerka

Richárd Zgyerka

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Richárd Zgyerka
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tofuist: Kikugawa Eizan 菊川 英山 (1787 – 1867), a very skilled ukiyô-e artist and painter called his picture “Courtesan reading poet Ono no Komachi’s biography” (1812). The book is about the legendary female poet 小野小町 of the Heian period (approx.825- 900).

tofuist: Kikugawa Eizan 菊川 英山 – a very skilled ukiyô-e artist and painter called his picture “Courtesan reading poet Ono no Komachi’s biography” The book is about the legendary female poet 小野小町 of the Heian period

A hyakumanto pagoda and associated invocation Nara period (ca. 764-770) From the set of Hyakumanto (One Million Pagodas), a three-tier pagoda turned from hinoki (Japanese cypress) and sakaki (Cleyera ochnacea), the detachable finial covering an interior cavity containing a block-printed dharani (charm) in scroll form With a wood storage box 8 1/4in (21cm) high  BONHAMS 9/15/2015 $8125

A hyakumanto pagoda and associated invocation Nara period (ca.

One of the “ 1M Pagodas” (Hyakumanto) and Invocation | Nara period (710–794) "his miniature wooden pagoda (tō) is one of 1M (hyakuman) commissioned by the Emp. Shōtoku (718–770) and distributed to Japan’s 10 major temples; this one belonged to the temple Hōryūji  where 3000 of the 1M pagodas were given away in 1908 to those contributing to an appeal for funds. Each pagoda was painted white and contained a printed Buddhist text called a darani (Sanskrit: dharani), or invocation."

One of the “One Million Pagodas” (Hyakumanto) and Invocation. Period: Nara period Date: ca. Culture: Japan Medium: Japanese cypress (hinoki) and Cleyera ochnacea (sakaki) Dimensions: a.

Women's painted eyebrows trend in the Tang Dynasty

This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It's based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming you . Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty

Women's Japanese Prehistoric Jōmon Pottery. All Jomon pots were made by hand, the potter building up the vessel from the bottom with coil upon coil of soft clay. The clay was mixed with a variety of adhesive materials, including mica, lead, fibers, and crushed shells. After the vessel was formed, tools were employed to smooth both the outer and interior surfaces. When completely dry, it was fired in an outdoor bonfire at a temperature of no more than about 900° C.

Jomon Pottery - Metropolitan Museum of Art Women's Prehistoric Jomon Pottery