Caffeine in coffee is often mistakenly categorized as a trigger for rosacea, while it's the heat that is the true culprit. Learn why: http://www.rosacea.org/rr/2003/spring/qa.php

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Q&A: Coffee or Tea @ Localized Flare-ups | Rosacea.org

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Rosacea is not considered an infectious disease, and there is no evidence that it can be spread by contact with the skin or through inhaling airborne bacteria. Learn more: http://www.rosacea.org/rr/1998/summer/qa.php

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Q&A: Contagious? & Chlorine | Rosacea.org

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Subtype 2 rosacea, characterized by persistent facial redness with bumps and pimples, is often mistaken for acne. Read more about identifying the differences between rosacea and acne: http://www.rosacea.org/rr/2013/winter/article_1.php

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The signs of rosacea are often mistakenly associated with heavy drinking. While alcohol can aggravate the condition, those who have rosacea are not necessarily heavy drinkers, and even teetotalers may be affected.

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National Rosacea Society

Another myth is that rosacea may be associated with poor hygiene, but the two are unrelated. Here are some useful tips for helping educate others on the condition: http://www.rosacea.org/rr/1999/fall/tips.php

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